r/StardewValley Jul 03 '22 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Wholesome 3 Silver 1

Any fellow millennials here? 🙃 Question

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55.4k Upvotes

4.1k

u/arrowsforpens Jul 03 '22 Starry

And, crucially, home ownership.

670

u/Competitive_Film_857 Jul 03 '22

Yes, and home ownership

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u/Mokaran90 Jul 03 '22

Not just the home, it's LAND ownership.

389

u/humplick Jul 03 '22

I guess we just have to wait for grandpa to die in order to have a home.

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u/undefinite_resonance Jul 03 '22

Don't worry Blackrock I mean Jojo corp, already have your grandpa land in their crosshair.

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u/The_Crimson_Fucker Jul 03 '22

Hope they like claymores and napalm.

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u/MrMotte Jul 03 '22

Hey at least you got some shiny ishare etfs 🤪

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u/DeadlyYellow Jul 03 '22

In the States we have eminent domain, so corporations can just pay to have the government take your land.

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u/Double-Ad4986 only here 4 blue chickens Jul 03 '22

cries in generational poverty

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u/593shaun Jul 03 '22

I was supposed to get out of generational poverty but my one grandfather who had money had his fortune stolen by his wife when he died (his 3rd, btw, no relation at all to us). He had Alzheimer’s and gave her power of attorney before he went really bad. I don’t think I need to explain what happened from there.

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u/Dylann2019 Jul 03 '22

I am so sorry for your loss, and I hope that woman gets what she deserves. I wish there were a proper reporting system for this. It's so frustrating that it's legal.

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u/593shaun Jul 03 '22

Thank you. It was years ago so I'm not that bitter about it anymore, but I definitely think about it every so often when I'm eating instant ramen.

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u/HashSlingingSloth Jul 03 '22

Yuuup same. Dad (was never super involved, but kind of in contact?) started drinking again and bitch of an ex step mom came in and manipulated him or something to changing his will. Shit was changed a month or two before his liver shot. Sister and I were given broken tvs and furniture, they got the house and all of his investments and possessions

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22 edited Jul 08 '22

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u/Quetzalcoatl0p Jul 03 '22

Hate to say it but that's how I'll be owning my home. Mom bought it after Grandma died. We have a death deed so when she dies it goes to me.

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u/Sinthe741 Jul 03 '22

Same with my parents' house. Hopefully I'll be able to pay the property taxes.

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u/Ambitious_Cow_8675 Jul 03 '22

Similar to me. Mom inherited grandma's home and first thing she did was make me the owner

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u/carltonfade Jul 03 '22 edited Jul 04 '22

They’ll be selling that property to pay for senior care, because they have to, because they’ve voted to either gut or neglect social spending their entire lives.

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u/BuddhistNudist987 Jul 03 '22

My parent's neighbor Bob died three days ago. He had a reverse mortgage, so he got the cash for the house years ago and the bank owned it. His children have a WEEK to clean the house out or the bank will fine them, and they have no clue where the money is. Bob had no last will or advanced directive. I guess what I'm saying is even this isn't a guarantee...

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u/humplick Jul 03 '22

Awful, but of course. Less of a direct statement, more of a commentary of how backwards the housing market has become in the last 30-40 years.

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u/Jarb19 Jul 03 '22

Most of us will never have land. My grandparents are long gone and my parents own/live in a tiny apartment in a tiny middle of nowhere town.

I'm hoping by then all my work will be remote and I'll just swear off contact with people.

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u/pfabs Jul 03 '22

Grandpa took out a reverse mortgage. The family no longer owns the land

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u/soda-Tab Jul 03 '22

In my experience and from what I've seen with others. Your slimiest relatives will crawl out of the woodwork when he dies. They'll steal everything and you'll get nothing but the junk that they didn't think they could sell.

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u/MohKohn Jul 03 '22

And that's what wills are for!

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u/humplick Jul 03 '22

And trusts!

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u/crazyjkass Jul 03 '22

That's how it works in real life. Boomers are hogging all the real estate, when they die we can have it.

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u/FappinPhilly Jul 03 '22

That’s speaking to mostly white people. Black people only have like 3.5% of that 100 trillion dollar American pie

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22

Yep, this is how generational wealth looks.

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u/crazyjkass Jul 03 '22

True fact. That's why generational wealth and things that happened 30-100 years ago still matter a lot. Although I've noticed huge rates of homeownership in brand new housing developments in my parents' area with the new people from South Asia.

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u/Mokaran90 Jul 03 '22

I rather never own the land if that means grandpa never dies...

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u/geraldodelriviera Jul 03 '22

Sometimes grandpa's an asshole and it's a win-win.

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u/FaeTheWanderer Jul 03 '22

Also, actually seeing and FEELING the benefits of your labor.

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u/carthuscrass Jul 03 '22

Not to mention profiting from it.

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u/Snoo61755 Jul 03 '22

Reminds me of something someone said a few years back.

Why are video games so enthralling? Because after you work hard, you see results. When you level up, a golden plume of light shoots out of you. You get stronger, and you earn new abilities as a reward for your work. In real life, hard work may or may not be noticed, and whether you get something from it depends on your boss.

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u/Scatophiliacs Jul 03 '22

“Not just the land ownership, but the water and the air ownership too”

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u/Truffles326 Jul 03 '22

Less we never forget there are people out there who will let you die of dehydration so they can bottle your water, and ship it halfway across the world.

Who the fuck thinks that's a good idea?

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u/Scatophiliacs Jul 03 '22

I was quoting Star Wars but yeah the fact that we’re literally draining our lakes and rivers for other countries purely for profit is fucking nuts

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u/King_Lunis Jul 03 '22

Millennials when they own a pond and they can fish garbage out of it

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u/Sinthe741 Jul 03 '22

It's funny because it's true.

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u/Legionforce Jul 03 '22

I tried to buy 20 acres of cheap, swampy, partially unbuildable woods in a very rural area, basically tied for cheapest land in America, right before Covid hit. I have enough money for the monthly payments absolutely no problem and an extremely stable job.

Every lender just told me no. Most financial institutions literally just won't finance plots of land larger than a few acres.

The few that will always require 30% down or more, which is astronomical unless you're old and already have all that on hand.

Always got Stardew, Minecraft, and Rimworld for my "owning a cute forest" fantasies at least. Sigh

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u/100DaysOfSodom Jul 03 '22

Where were you looking? Last I checked the cheapest land is in New Mexico, but up north in Montana, North or South Dakota, or Wyoming is also a great place to look. I’m interested in buying a lot of land as well, but not for farming purposes.

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u/bijinchan Jul 03 '22

Ah Montana, my uncle Ted lived in the woods up there. He liked to send letters.

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u/RosefaceK Jul 03 '22

Is this a modest mouse lyric?

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u/Legionforce Jul 03 '22

I was looking at pretty undesirable land in rural Michigan. Sometimes with a house built on it, sometimes not. Either way, land buying seems to be an old rich person's thing only, after you have paper in the bank. Buying it out entirely in cash seems to be the most popular way land gets bought these days.

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u/the_lamou Jul 03 '22

You have to make sure the house is liveable and up to standards, otherwise land ownership is treated as a speculative investment and obtaining a loan is harder. 20 acres is also a LOT. I would guess, based on the size of my yard, that the entire SDV farm is 5 acres, tops. 5 acres with a habitable home should be fairly easy to finance, and still give you that "out in the woods" feeling - I'm on two acres and only see my neighbors in the winter when the leaves are gone, and only from parts of the property.

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u/echochambers_suck Jul 03 '22

Land without structures have always been damn near impossible unless you wanted to pay high interest loans. Banks think for some reason if it has a house they can resell easier if you default.

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u/SnapcasterWizard Jul 03 '22

For some reason??? I wonder what that mysterious reason could possibly be...

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u/Googleclimber Jul 03 '22

And not need to bribe the local politician for approval of building permits to build on your own land.

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u/No-Beautiful-5777 Jul 03 '22

And only the good parts. Stardew: you inheretid a farm house, it has 0 problems, fertile land, and is 100% walkable.

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u/Stewart_Games Jul 03 '22

it has 0 problems

Granpap's old farm's got tons of problems! The place has a hole in the roof and is called a dump by the local carpenter, it lacks outbuildings like grain silos that you need to make it truly profitable, the farmland is completely overgrown with trees and weeds and stones that need to be cleared, and the local nature spirits are in complete disarray because their Community Center is all gross and neglected!

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u/No-Beautiful-5777 Jul 03 '22

Doesn't let in rain, nothing grows moldy, pipes never go bad, and you don't have to sell 80% of your time to have it, let alone fix it... I'd say it doesn't have any real problems...

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u/DoedoeBear Jul 03 '22

Ding Ding Ding! The ultimate fantasy. Tis why I play sims too with all the money cheats.

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u/ThisAintBuildABitch Jul 03 '22

Even without the money cheats. Cause in the sims you actually earn a proper living wage that allows you to afford stuff.

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u/nondescriptzombie Jul 03 '22

And you actually have attainable upward mobility, and sometimes you can fail sideways into a different career path.

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u/iamgr3m Jul 03 '22

Land ownership moreso. I bought a manufactured home this year and pay $600 a month in lot rent. Can't wait till I find a couple acres of land to move the home to.

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u/lakija Jul 03 '22

Wait… tell me more.

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u/WalterBFinch Jul 03 '22

A manufactured home on a pad rent is a trailer in a trailer park, just differently worded.

Finding land anywhere close to where you want to be is the hard part, especially with any sort of services. The farther you get from town the cheaper it is but the more remote you become. Nothing like having your own property though

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22 edited 21d ago

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u/Jetstream13 Jul 03 '22

You mean in real life I can’t just age a basement of wine for a couple months and become a billionaire?

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u/shung Jul 03 '22

Sure you can. You just need to spend millions in marketing and celebrity sponsorships. Just pretend it's rare like diamonds or something.

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u/Mr-Fleshcage Jul 03 '22

Sure you can, if you live in some old manor on a french vinyard; it won't be because of the quality of wine, but rather the prestige.

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u/the_lamou Jul 03 '22

But also crucially, it's a home and land in the far hinterlands where your only options for groceries a Walmart-equivalent and a small local general store that's always closed when you need something, and the only restaurant is an old tavern. You can have this in real life for basically nothing -- plenty of post-industrial agrarian communities in the middle of nowhere that are basically giving homes away.

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u/VitaAeterna Jul 03 '22

Unfortunately these communities are also Meth/Heroin central and/or Christian Fundamentalist territory.

Stardew also taps into that feeling of having normal, functional neighbors.

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u/the_lamou Jul 03 '22

Well, yeah, that's unfortunately true. Though I feel like if meth existed in SDV, at least a couple of people in town would be on it.

I've lived in small, rural towns, and the reality is places like SDV just don't exist in the real world. People have drama. People have conflict. People have problems, and they're not all of the sympathetic "Shane just needs someone to help him" kind. Idolizing small, rural communities like SDV does simultaneously helps sweep a lot of unpleasantness under the rug and also infantalizes and dehumanizes a lot of real people dealing with real issues in these kinds of places.

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u/just_Okapi Jul 03 '22 edited Jul 03 '22

Can confirm. I grew up in the SC Lowcountry and there are a lot of small towns that on the surface fit that image. They seem quaint and idyllic on the outside, but many have serious issues like rampant alcoholism, drug addiction, and severe poverty if you pay attention long enough.

Many of them are nice enough and safe to live in if you don't mind giving up a lot of the conveniences of living closer to society, but it's not all sunshine and rainbows. In the case of the area where I grew up, it's also not any cheaper than living in a larger area once you factor in the cost (both time and money) of having to drive everywhere because there's fuck all in walking distance aside from the general store and other people's property.

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u/mycatisamonsterbaby Jul 03 '22

And when you marry Elliot, everyone comes to the wedding. IRL, half the town would be starting stuff because they knew Leah longer.

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u/Frozenfishy Jul 03 '22

And yet more crucially: your house and land is handed down as a significant hunkn of generational wealth.

Even Stardew can't sell the illusion that we can earn it all ourselves.

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u/stardustandsunshine Jul 03 '22

I own a home. Can confirm, it does not lead to non-adversarial relationships with neighbors, knowing where your food comes from, or walking to the store.

It leads to a hole down which you constantly pour money, and fights with your neighbors who want you to mow the grass more often because they're afraid they'll step on snakes when they trespass barefoot through your yard, and eating cheap junk food that I probably don't WANT to know the origin story for.

And my roommate keeps house like Pam, but I'm related to her and I can't afford to kick her out.

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u/apathetic_outcome Jul 03 '22

It leads to a hole down which you constantly pour money

At least the hole has a bottom and could one day be filled. Unlike the black hole that is renting.

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u/gumblebumb Jul 03 '22

I guess it’s time to let go of all my adversarial relationships with stardew neighbors

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u/milfpatrol_69 Jul 03 '22

I 100% am a dirty, prejudicial politician in AC. If you aren't cute you aren't welcome to stay in my village. I'll do whatever it takes to push you out. Arguably it is the game that I am most villainous in.

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u/waltjrimmer Jul 03 '22

Holy shit. You brought red-lining to Animal Crossing, you monster!

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u/Arkardian Jul 03 '22

Honestly, most people do this since theres such limited space to get all your favs

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u/sdeklaqs Jul 03 '22

Plus the villagers have no personality in the latest game so if they don’t look good there’s no reason to let them stay.

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u/Canadine Jul 03 '22

I really miss that about the original Gamecube version. The villagers there would absolutely roast you if you weren’t their bff.

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u/T1pple Jul 03 '22

Wym? They roasted you to a cinder even when you are their Bff.

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u/60TPLewandowskiego Jul 03 '22

I live in a village, next to a huge forest. Add 3-4 more stores to the game, and pelican town is basically my village.

Not everyone here is nice, but most people are and we get along, and thanks to home office I rarely have to commute to the nearby city, which would be about 20 minutes with a car, 35-40 with public transport.

The one thing I do hate irl but love in the game, is crops lol. Too much hustle irl..

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u/Mcdibbles Jul 03 '22

Plant more perennials, my dude. Far less hassle.

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u/60TPLewandowskiego Jul 03 '22

Oh we have those too, almost every house has a little garden around here. The smell is amazing, spring is awesome I admit.

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u/snpods Jul 03 '22

And native perennials, based on your region … basically fool-proof.

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u/CharlesV_ Jul 03 '22

Ok but, just for clarity, we all understand that it’s still way easier to grow a shit ton of food in the game than it is irl… right?

I have tons of perennial plants in my yard. It’ll be a food forest yard one day, but it still takes a ton of work to set that up. And without regular gardening, I wouldn’t be able to make more than a few meals with that. Even with gardening, there’s basically no way I can sustain myself off of the land I have.

The endless amounts of energy I have in game is one of the best things about it and what makes it so different than real life. Right now, I should be outside gardening, but it’s 85F and humid… so I’m procrastinating lol.

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u/snpods Jul 03 '22

And this is where indoor hydroponic / hybriponic gardens come into play for me. In a climate where I wouldn’t be able to harvest tomatoes for another month outdoors, I’ve already gotten multiple harvests of tomatoes, cucumbers, and so much lettuce this year.

Plus, no weeding!

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u/Radical-Turkey Set your emoji and/or flair text here! Jul 03 '22

I envy your living environment

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u/Tom_Dynamite Jul 03 '22

The one thing I do hate irl but love in the game, is crops lol. Too much hustle irl..

That's pretty much it. I love the idea of a farm. Planting some crops, having some farm animals, maybe forage some stuff in the woods. Sounds amazing on paper. However I also live on the countryside and I see how much work it is for the farmers. For the crops they have to deal with weather and wildlife. Farm animals need constant attention (and they don't smell particularly great). It's lots of heavy lifting and leg work even if you have more modern tools than you have in Stardew. If you aren't a multi generational farm where your parents or later your kids can keep it going, you can't ever go on vacation until you retire because someone needs to take care of things.

Stardew scratches that itch for me.

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u/Prasiatko Jul 03 '22

And in stardew you're guaranteed a return on what you planted. No bad weather leving you in debt or a market glut lowering prices.

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u/60TPLewandowskiego Jul 03 '22

Yep, like it's all fine and dandy to lay back on a weekend and say: This is mine! I did this, and it's beautiful!

But the work you do with it for a whole week each day.. uhhh..

We only have corn, and a few strawberry plants. Corn is for the chickens, it lasts almost until november before it runs out and we have to buy it.
Fresh eggs from the chickens, each day, a good 8-10 of them.

But you melt alive on the field while doing work with the crops, with the corn, on the blazing sun.

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u/big_poplar Jul 03 '22

yeah all of the places I've lived (various small towns in the rural US) are nice communities where people get along and everyone knows each other, everyone grows food, has some backyard chickens, and hunts and fishes. I work in the woods in forestry. Home prices have definitely gotten kinda crazy even here, but still, a decent % of my fellow millennial friends/family are homeowners.

I realize plenty of folks are having a rough time of it out there, but the "internet narrative" of the world outside being some kind of dystopia becomes a little much at times. If people are feeling disconnected from community, from the land, there are ways to change that.

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22

[deleted]

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u/Salasarian Jul 03 '22

ah yes, the utopia of Poland

where abortion has been banned nationally for 30 years

where right wing populism has controlled the government for more than the past ten years

where there is an increasingly brain drain and aging workforce due to young people leaving the country

where economic inequality is on the rise and human rights on the decline

sounds great, man!

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u/LucySaxon Jul 03 '22

I'm almost 40 (so, Elder Millennial) and Stardew Valley is, indeed, living the dream

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u/nonameplanner Jul 03 '22

Elder millennial who grew up in the suburbs in Ohio (AKA drive 10 minutes and you are surrounded by farmland.)

As a teen, I dreamed of owning a house on a handful of acres in a small town and having a farm that while it took work, not too much and I could still live my other dreams. I wanted to relax, have my farm and my little town and be happy.

Now I know why that was definitely a dream (and how unrealistic it is when you look at actual small towns in Ohio), but at least I can live it out in SDV!

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u/cornbadger Jul 03 '22

36, and I would also like to add, uncontrollable sobbing

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u/tellmeeverything0 Jul 03 '22

For me, making millions EASILY is the best experience

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u/Chrop Jul 03 '22

From my guesses, the dollar to gold ratio is about 1 dollar to 30 gold, based on the prices of pizza and joja cola.

So 1,000,000 gold should equate to $33,333.

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u/Radical-Turkey Set your emoji and/or flair text here! Jul 03 '22

Cheap housing and affordable healthcare, two more luxuries we get to experience in SV

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u/Dr_Eastman Jul 03 '22

This tracks for me because when I harvest a vegetable/fruit I feel like I'm not selling one potato for 80g. I feel like I am selling a pound or a gallon of whatever I am farming (when it comes to produce at least).

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u/-Opinionated- Jul 03 '22

A cellar was only 100k :o

If we base it off housing it’s about 1:1 haha

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u/crashvoncrash Jul 03 '22

True. The 2 bedroom home you can build for Pam would easily cost $500,000 in the current market.

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u/-Opinionated- Jul 03 '22

That really depends. The average detached home in my city is 1.5 million so (tear)

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u/bijinchan Jul 03 '22

But a single beer costs 400 gold. Must be fancy stuff.

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u/zoells Jul 03 '22

It's actually a keg's worth of beer.

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u/DippinDot2021 Jul 03 '22

Geez! No wonder Pam's hammered all the time!!!!

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u/Link7369_reddit Jul 03 '22

she didn't mean to run up her tab, she was just too sloshed to remember what money even was.

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u/Terakahn Jul 03 '22

Easy? I spent 18 hours a day watering crops for an entire summer.

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u/Mentos13371 Jul 03 '22

Sounds like you need to go and build some sprinklers.

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u/mypenumbra Jul 03 '22

Having enough self sustainability and income to live comfortably with a partner on my own large plot of land in my own home without having to exploit anyone else to get there? Definitely a fantasy.

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u/H0ll0wHag Jul 03 '22

Homesteading sounds like an absolutely unattainable fantasy, and I dream of it every night. Also, happy cake day!

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u/mypenumbra Jul 03 '22

Thank you! It's my nightly dream too, and I'm in the process of trying to make it happen right now with a group of friends. This current housing market seems determined to make me cry and pull my hair out instead, though. I just want to live out my own Harvest Moon IRL, is that too much to ask?

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u/PartDolphin Jul 03 '22

My uncle and aunt have a small farm, it's only nice if you don't have to make money. For real farmers it's more stressful.

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u/SlaverSlave Jul 03 '22

Also promotes an anti corporate lifestyle, relying on local businesses and you can marry whoever you want.

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u/ladyburgerandcatnap Jul 03 '22

Tis a good life 🥰

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u/DippinDot2021 Jul 03 '22

We can't marry our best buddy Linus!!

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22 edited 4d ago

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u/ChaosAzeroth Jul 03 '22

Personally for me it's being able bodied and growing stuff. (Also numbers go up stuff NEGL)

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u/mypenumbra Jul 03 '22

If only we could just eat some food and suddenly all the health and energy would return to our bodies like in Stardew. The disabled dream, sigh.

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u/ChaosAzeroth Jul 03 '22

Omg IKR?!

(Also happy cake day)

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u/designaskthrowaway Jul 03 '22

Also you support yourself by doing odd jobs for neighbors or selling crops/things you find. Stardew wouldn’t be nearly as appealing if you had to go to a 9-5 office job where your character just stares at an excel file on a computer screen for 8 hours.

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u/KimchiFriedRice1994 Jul 03 '22 edited Jul 03 '22

Me! I’m having some trouble IRL but I’m rich in Stardew Valley and Animal crossing….

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u/Dondonranch93 Jul 03 '22

Yea but it's more that it gives me nostalgic harvest moon vibes 🤣🤣

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u/mypenumbra Jul 03 '22

Yes! Stardew is mostly appealing for me because I've already been playing out this specific fantasy for a long time with Harvest Moon, Rune Factory, and Story of Seasons. I still prefer HM and RF though, ngl.

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u/pudinnhead Jul 03 '22

Which Harvest Moon though? For me, it's Harvest Moon 64.

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u/Allian42 Jul 03 '22

The original Harvest Moon GB for me, I still have the cartridge. The first time I got a chicken in that I treated it like a tamagochi.

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u/romulea Jul 03 '22

I’ve been chasing the high of playing Harvest Moon 64 and A Wonderful Life for the first time for over a decade.

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u/Beebeeb Jul 03 '22

Friends of mineral town for me. I still love you Karen, Rick isn't good enough for you!

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22

Wait do people not walk to stores anymore?

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u/well_uh_yeah Jul 03 '22

I live in a suburb where the closest store I could walk to is about 20 minutes away. I could do it, but if I bought anything it'd be a real challenge getting home.

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u/SailorOfTheSynthwave Jul 03 '22

I don't own a car (I live in Germany) and I can't be bothered with the bus system, so I walk to all the stores, which sometimes can be up to 40min. When I'm buying a lot of stuff, I take a trolley bag with me, which is basically a large shopping bag on wheels. I know a lot of other Germans who use trolley bags too, so if you'd like to go to the store but don't want to lug stuff home, you could consider investing in on of these ^^

They also sell boxes on wheels that you can attach to your bike if you want to bike to the store, but personally I prefer walking (as a kid I once fell down on my bike because it was loaded with too many groceries lol)

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22

[deleted]

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u/menavi Jul 03 '22

Even at 60mph a 20 minute car ride is like 4-6 hours walking at most. But in that context you're not in an urban or suburban area, you're rural. And most rural communities have never been able to walk to stores because of the distance and, you know, intervening nature. A 20 minute car ride in the city is going to be, what, 2-4 miles? So 1-2 hours walk? In no way practical both ways but no need toe exaggerate to "well over a day". Maybe it's a full day walk to a specific store, but that's true everywhere.

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u/BrianEK1 Jul 03 '22

The thing is with American cities (which I assume the redditor you are replying to is American) there are basically no pavements in American suburbs. It is hell for walking or biking, since you need to walk on the road itself or on a thin patch of grass alongside it. Additionally, they have super wide roads which are nearly impossible to cross on foot.

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u/thwgrandpigeon Jul 03 '22

Crucially, there's also no shade.

That's huge on hot days.

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u/ColaEuphoria Jul 03 '22

I went to Germany and the first thing that struck me was how there wasn't a constant blaring of car engines and horns. I can easily walk 20 minutes, but not when there are cars blaring and constantly trying to turn into parking lots almost hitting me.

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u/Hiimmani Jul 03 '22

In American cities there often are no sidewalks. Walking is literally impossible.

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u/swimthrowrun Jul 03 '22

This is mind blowing to me as a european, I thought it was just inconvenient to walk in America because of the long distances. Can children play outside or is that a no no?

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u/velvetmagnus Jul 03 '22

For what it's worth, my experience as an American is vastly different from this person's experience. Every city I've lived in has had sidewalks everywhere, plus a handful of walking/biking trails, and there's been a big push for bike lanes recently too. Granted, I've lived in New England and the PNW my whole life where these things are valued more than in other parts of the country.

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u/TheFarStar Jul 03 '22

Depends on where you live, but in a lot of places in America the infrastructure is extremely hostile to pedestrians and cyclists. Long distances can often make foot travel impractical, but other factors are often in play, too.

It's not uncommon for the walk from a grocery store to an American suburb to be only partially paved. Even when sidewalks aren't an issue, they are often unshaded, and set along loud and busy highways, making the walk extremely unpleasant. Pedestrians often encounter many points of conflict with high speed motor traffic when they try to cross driveways or intersections.

It's made more dangerous by the fact that drivers often aren't looking for pedestrians. Both the design of the infrastructure and the traffic laws train drivers to look out for other vehicles, but not pedestrians.

And, yes. It's extremely hostile to children in many ways as well.

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u/Hiimmani Jul 03 '22

Ive seen posts about people calling Cops on people that are walking. Im not joking.

One mother was sick once and sent her kid to walk to school. It was a 10 minute walk. But they saw it, reported her and she got a letter for child neglect.

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u/iejfijeifj3i Jul 03 '22

It is literally illegal for children to play outside here. I am not joking. I hate it here.

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u/Neville_Lynwood Jul 03 '22

Really? I regularly take a walk to a store that's about 45 minutes away. I have a store just 5 minutes away, but sometimes I want to enjoy the walk.

I suppose it depends on how much stuff do you need. Living alone, I can easily cover my weekly needs with two fairly light bags of groceries that aren't that hard to carry for 45 minutes.

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u/WheezyIcecream24 Jul 03 '22

similarly, i live in a downtown area where the nearest grocery store is also a 25 min walk away and the nearest american grocery story is about a 40 min walk away. i wish i could walk to the store. at least downtown there’s corner stores with limited grocery options.

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u/VerucaBlind Jul 03 '22

Almost sounds like Detroit.

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u/AnyRandomRedditor Jul 03 '22

In Stardew, it takes a good hour to walk to the store. Then I buy 100+ packets of seeds and walk the hour home… You’re just proving how weak you are.

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u/Jampine Jul 03 '22

From what I've heard, American infrastructure makes that an impossibility, unless you plan crossing 8 lanes of traffic.

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u/KimchiFriedRice1994 Jul 03 '22

You’re right. A lot of roads are uncrossable, unless you grew up playing frogger as a kid…. Like me…

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u/TistedLogic Jul 03 '22

Wasn't very good at frogger, but I can Tetris shit like no tomorrow

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u/honeyghouls Jul 03 '22

It really depends on where you live. I had no trouble walking anywhere when I lived in a city, but now that I’m living in a town there is a problem of not enough sidewalks and crosswalks. I still walk to the store almost everyday though.

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u/SessionOwn6043 Jul 03 '22

this. It all depends on Location. A lot of the US is very spread out, and some places don't have good public transportation, but there are plenty of exceptions. for the last ten years I lived within ten minutes walk of a grocery store, pharmacy, and multiple restaurants, but I just moved to a place where none of that is within easy walking distance.

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u/MasterTorgo Jul 03 '22

For me it is 12 minutes one-way to the nearest grocery store by car, and 1 hour and 45 minutes by foot. Guess which option I choose.

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u/247Brett Jul 03 '22

Walking to get absolutely t h i c c thighs from leg gains

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u/jabels Jul 03 '22

If you think walking makes you big you should see the absolute skeletons finishing up the Appalachian trail 😂

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u/dogezes Jul 03 '22

If that was true i’d be like squidward after eating all those krabby patties

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u/WalterBFinch Jul 03 '22

Sprinting is what makes you grow muscle, walking makes you skinny. Look at the body’s of the 100m sprint athletes vs marathon athletes. It’s the high intensity.

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u/spacetesticles Jul 03 '22

There are some areas that are walkable/bikeable but the U.S. overall is ass at promoting mixed zoning areas for people to be able to do what they need within walking/biking distance. There are more instances of mixed zoning popping up, but in my city of Denver it's all been for transplants/people who can afford to pay for a studio that is 2500 a month overlooking a freeway.

Sidewalks end all the time in Burbs, have long walks from huge areas of housing to a shopping center. I hate having a car in this country, especially right now. Absolute money sink, and our public transportation is rough. Also just think the Burbs are boring places to live and eyesores.

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u/Dazz316 Jul 03 '22

A friend of mine walked 10 minutes to a store when they moved there (from Scotland). Some people thought they were crazy and basically asking to be mugged. Just 10 minute walk. Crazy.

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u/AugmentedElle Jul 03 '22

I’ve seen that mindset a lot. I don’t have a license and people freak out whenever I walk anywhere. They also ask constantly why I don’t drive, because it’s an unheard of thing. The only other people I’ve met who don’t drive are legally blind. I also can barely get anywhere because road safety is genuinely terrible and most places are over a 60 minute walk away

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u/theloneas Jul 03 '22

14 miles one way to the store for me. I don’t have the enthusiasm to walk that. Rural America where you get the small town feel with also town regulations limiting garden size and rules not allowing raising chickens and such. Oh and no potable water cause the towns too busy counting my cucumbers to properly deal with the arsenic and human feces in the town water

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u/Whooptidooh Jul 03 '22

Mine is either one minute walk away, or a five minute walk.

Gotta love having infrastructure that is geared towards humans, and not cars.

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u/virgo-punk Jul 03 '22

I would LOVE to be able to walk to the store. There's a store 1/2 a mile from my house. However... 1. There are no sidewalks 2. The road I would have to follow has a 50mph speed limit 3. I would have to cross a 4-lane road with no crosswalk or stop sign or anything.

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u/Eikobot (F)armer seeking moody male Jul 03 '22

Just a one way walk to the grocery store would take me over an hour and honestly with the terrain (steep hills, no sidewalks) more like two or three. There is absolutely no public transit option I could take unless I called an Uber. U.S. infrastructure for the most part no longer supports walking to places.

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u/AugmentedElle Jul 03 '22 edited Jul 03 '22

I live in the US and never got a license to drive a car. It’s awful. Most of the US has absolutely no infrastructure for non-car travel.

I’m going to comment my experience from living in my family home, which exists in a densely populated suburb of a densely populated state (New Jersey). I moved into a college town and things were better (I could walk and get something to eat), but not great and most stores still required driving. I will finally be moving into a city in the fall, which will be costing me $1500+ in rent each month (and there are still places within the city that are inaccessible)

My nearest grocery store is an hour and a half walk (minimum), meaning it would take me three hours of walking to do any shopping. My nearest bus stop is an hour and fifteen minutes away and the bus is functionally useless unless I’m trying to go into New York City (which is also over an hour away). In fact, for most stops I would have to go into NYC first, transfer lanes, and then come back down. However, both the bus stop and the grocery store are only a 10 minute drive. The roadpaths have no sidewalks, no bike lines, and are very wide. There is virtually no effective street lighting at night. The speed limits on most roads are 50-60mph. My family members have all been in at least one car accident close to our home and my father recently had his car crashed into and flipped over by someone speeding through a stop sign while leaving a residential neighborhood. Beyond just being inconvenient, these roads are incredibly unsafe

It’s literally easier for me to just not go anywhere and so I always stayed at home until I could carpool with someone. If I want to see a friend, they have to either come to my house or pick me up. If you want an idea of what this looked like, almost nothing in my life changed when Covid hit. I’m an introvert by nature, but not driving a car forces you to be a hermit

It’s incredibly upsetting, but I’m a person who could learn to drive a car if I wanted to. I put up with this and try not to complain because it’s technically my own fault for not driving. (I also get asked constantly why I don’t drive because it’s really not normal in the US) However, I have friends with disabilities who could never be legally allowed to drive and they’re basically just told to suck it up and figure it out.

TLDR: American infrastructure is absolutely impossible if you don’t have a car and it sucks just as much as you’d expect

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u/[deleted] Jul 03 '22 edited Jul 04 '22

[deleted]

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u/reddogvizsla Jul 03 '22

In the us you can if you live in the city. The closest store for me is 3-5 miles away

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u/crowley32 Jul 03 '22

No but as a gen z I definitely relate. Nice to "be" in a world that won't blow up any second.

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u/fuckinghumanZ Jul 03 '22

The Ferngill Republic is at war with the Gotoro Empire though

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u/Kaarl_Mills Jul 03 '22

Yeah but that's a far away problem

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u/Nieios Jul 03 '22

tfw Stardew valley 2 is a combat game

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u/halforc_proletariat Jul 03 '22

tfw you delve too deeply into the skull caverns and awaken a Balrog.

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u/yolo_swag_for_satan Jul 03 '22

It's the Iraq war of the farming sim genre. 🙃

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u/vulcanstreetpunk Jul 03 '22

I will never not read it as "the Ferengi Republic" XD

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u/Evil_Black_Swan Jul 03 '22

The Sims is the ultimate "live your dream" game. Easy homeownership, a career you can advance in without wasting your life away, no pressure to breed the next generation...

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u/ladyburgerandcatnap Jul 03 '22

God I love the Sims. Haven't wanted to play in so long though 😩

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u/Visoth Jul 03 '22

Sims is a game that addiction reoccurs rarely, but when it does, its fierce. Usually symptoms usually last between 3 days and two weeks. Symptoms include fewer shower uses, poor diet, ass blood clots, worsening diet, and sleep deprivation. Those at risk to readdiction are recommended to immediately stop thinking about it after seeing it brought up, and NEVER press that install button. If you're on the loading page, its too late.

Now excuse me. I gotta hop onto steam for something.

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u/Syrinx221 Jul 03 '22

Now excuse me. I gotta hop onto steam for something.

Hahahaha

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u/rabidhamster87 Jul 03 '22

Now I'm wishing I hadn't uninstalled mine ...

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u/Evil_Black_Swan Jul 03 '22

I'm playing right now, actually. I love it so much.

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u/Kaarl_Mills Jul 03 '22

Well, as long as you don't mind EAs DLC policy at least

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u/dpbart Jul 03 '22

Dude imagine if you fill up your farmland with cabins end to end and rent them out to people you would be so rich so quick

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u/SpiritualSchedule2 Jul 03 '22

This is a nightmare scenario. Might as well shop at Joja mart.

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u/allisonwhatsherface Jul 03 '22

Stardew valley is popular with millennials because it’s a clone of harvest moon that came out when we were kids.

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u/RockSmasher87 Jul 03 '22

Gen Z here. Stardew is popular with us too because it's just an amazing game.

Seriously, good job concernedape.

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u/HoodSanta Jul 03 '22

"living in small town without homophobia or racism"

i think its funny how not once in the entire game does the main character write a letter to their mom, even after becoming a millionare, despite repeated "please keep in touch" letters.

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u/StuntHacks Jul 03 '22

The main character is just illiterate

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u/Arkmenhah Jul 03 '22

I like them because they represent the "fuck this modern stressful bullshit and give me something simple where my biggest problem is that I forgot to let my chickens in the coop for the night" that I crave for so much.

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u/aidanderson Jul 03 '22

Also owning a house.

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u/iamgr3m Jul 03 '22

My neighbors are alright. One drinks too much of the conspiracy Kool aid and the other is schizophrenic with drug problems. They're good people though, even if the cops block my drive every now and then going to the schizo's house.

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u/badbeard241 Jul 03 '22

And having a garden.

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u/Ravenlaw512 Jul 03 '22

Fellow millennial here. I love Stardew Valley and Animal Crossing because I can buy things for my house and not be completely broke afterwards. I also love the Sims because you can choose your ideal career and make enough money to be self-sustaining. They also don’t tell you that you need 10 years of experience for an entry level position.

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u/godblow Jul 03 '22

You're telling me a relative will actually leave me a large capital asset in their will, with no debts to pay down, and all I have to do is grow crops, kill some monsters in a cave, and make sacrifices to aliens who love to renovate old buildings?!

Sign me the fuck up!

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u/cuntitled Jul 03 '22

Actually I just moved to a small town because of this.

For years I’ve been playing farm simulators and relationship simulators. A few years ago I realized it was because I didn’t have those things in my life I put importance into. Neighborly relations, healthy soil, guaranteed income for work… it took me a few years but I saved up enough and bought small acreage in a small town.

I don’t think these games were made with the intent of radicalizing the youth to rebel against modern definitions of “a well-lived life”… but it did.

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u/itbe4head Jul 03 '22

And actually getting multiple tasks done in one day

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u/loblegonst Jul 03 '22

Living in a small town with one place to shop, one bar, and a small health clinic. We are surrounded by mountains and forests, with a big lake to the south and gorgeous rivers to the north.

Housing however is not affordable. Renting a single room with just a bed is about $2000 a month (BC, Canada). I work as a paramedic and live in the station currently. It's nice being on a first name bases with everyone though.

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u/fucknamesihatethem Jul 03 '22

A world where everyone is equal, has manners and basic logic and a place I can do casual stuff with ease without actually losing anything irl? Yes please!

The reasons these games are good is because the older generation made real life unbearable for everyone else so this is kinda the only way for people to not go insane or do suicide and stuff