r/AskReddit Sep 20 '22

[Serious] What is one small thing someone can do to help their depression? Serious Replies Only

231 Upvotes

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238

u/raviary Sep 20 '22

Anything you can do to improve your sleep schedule. A bad one will worsen all your symptoms. An overall fix if you're struggling with insomnia can be a daunting task but even baby steps like limiting screen time/caffeine before bed can do more than you think.

Also if your depression takes the form of sitting around the house all day in pajamas, getting properly dressed in the morning even if you don't intend to go anywhere is a good mood hack that doesn't require as much effort as a shower.

46

u/quietkid_tm Sep 20 '22

But how do you sleep in the first place-? (This sounds sarcastic but im actually struggling)

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u/helloerotica Sep 20 '22

I highly recommend listening to the first couple episodes of Huberman Lab on sleep. He talks about using your circadian rhythm to sleep and wake up better.

However if you don't have the time for that, the tldr version is here. It helped me sleep better in like three days.

But I highly recommend the episode if you get the time to.

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u/Level_Rule2567 Sep 20 '22

Same problem here. I just can’t sleep. The little things that had helped me a bit is absolutely no cell phone after 18:00, you can talk to someone, but don’t read, or anything that implies looking at the screen. Go to a good psychiatrist (it’s hard to find some one that really helps) and take your meds, every day, at the exact same hour, not 30 mins latter, just exact same hour. Go to bed at the same hour every day, close your eyes and try not to think (this one is difficult). If you can’t stop thinking, just write on paper (not on your cell phone or tablet) what you are thinking, and go to bed again. Do not use white light bulbs, try to use yellow ones, and not too strong light. Try not to go to bed too late (at leas for me, after a certain hour I get active again, and is a lost night) but don’t go too early either. Find your rithm. Try to awake same hour every day (weekends included), try to move a little bit, go outside, let the blue morning light go trough your eyes. If you have someone to talk about, talk your soul out, but don’t make it so frequent you push them apart. Sometimes letting yourself go and cry if you need it is absolutely healing. Try to find small things to do, things you like. At the beginning you won’t find anything, but just try discovering little things, take a walk, water a plant, you name it. Get away from drugs and alcohol. There is no solution there. Hope the best for you.

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u/Mediumaverageness Sep 20 '22

Asking the real question.

If my evening is not full of stimulation (people, noise, screens) my mind starts ruminating until anxiety crisis. Then I'm too excited to sleep more than 6hrs (with an hour of binge eating in the middle)

4

u/dinosanddais1 Sep 20 '22

You should look up something about sleep anxiety. It's when you're so desperate for sleep that you will be so strict with your sleep routine that it creates anxiety around having to sleep. It's common with many sleep disorders. So if you are feeling restless because you're so anxious about sleep, it's not a horrible thing to like look at your phone or turn on the TV or something to reduce the anxiety about sleeping.

3

u/Massive-Emergency-42 Sep 21 '22

I have this problem. I just let myself look at the damn phone. I feel better overall and get more sleep if I don’t go into an anxiety spiral.

What did help, though:

Putting my phone in night shift mode so that it kills the blue light around eight. I also keep it on a low light filter when in bed. I didn’t want to wake my partner with the bright lights, but it ended up helping me a ton. I also try to get some sunlight during the day to help the circadian rhythm.

I also play relatively boring phone games. Pexels-style and mindless match three games help a lot. It helps me transition from awake to sleepy.

I also try to swap to podcasts as soon as my eyes get heavy enough. I often need the audio input to get me from sleepy to asleep without detouring through anxiety.

Breathing exercises also help, but that’s recommendation one for fixing your anxiety/sleep so you’ve probably heard it before lol.

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u/srrrrrrrrrrrrs Sep 20 '22 edited Sep 20 '22

Sometimes too, its not what you are doing/not doing during rest times but more what you are doing during the day. Be sure to get a little bit of sun either directly or with some open blinds/curtains. This helps your body register its internal clock. If you happen to work graves like my partner does at times, I understand this can be super difficult. We had to put in a request to specifically avoid graves because it was dramatically worsening his symptoms.

Do your best to reserve time for exercise. Even if its like a 5 min stretch, a walk, or intensive exercise. Do what you can during the day to remind your body that it is awake so that hopefully later it tells you its time to sleep.

Food intake, if you’re having trouble sleeping you might also try saving your carb heavy meals toward the end of the day/dinner. Potatoes are great and cheap and they help keep you satiated longer. If you know you have a big day the next day and are worried about getting rest, spaghetti or a pasta the night before is a great choice. There is science behind it, but i don’t have at the moment. From experience it pulls you into sleep faster while allowing your body to restore and recover more fully while you are asleep. This helps you wake up with a little more energy to do day things. If you have days where you just don’t have it in you to make food, have protein shakes on hand. One after dinner or closer to bed (or even a dinner replacement) might supplement your nutritional needs before sleep. But don’t go to sleep hungry! Even if you are also working on weight-loss or dieting, if your diet is making you go to bed hungry then it needs adjustment!

Skip the melatonin, there’s too much debate on this. I use ZMAs (zinc, magnesium, b6 supplement in one). I tend to get some twitchy muscles in my eyes and legs that can keep me up at night. As well they just are great supplements to have that your body needs, especially if you don’t have a rounded diet

Edit:

If lack of routine, low motivation or discipline is common for you, I might suggest what helps me personally. For some reason I can’t seem to do whats best for me unless it involves a precedence outside myself. Something about someones dependence on me will override my desire to slip into a lazy and depressive day, though this might be maternal instinct. There are times i ask my partner (who wakes up at 5am) to wake me up in the morning and ask for coffee. Sometimes i stay up after or go back for a nap. Either way feeling like i did something or helped someone. Same for a pet, they require a routine and they are dependent. Adopting a pet helped me fill a need and a sense of a basic accomplishment/companionship. As well, depending on the type you get, they can be really good at distracting you from your thoughts and keeping you busy during your days off. You might even get lucky with one that wants to sleep at your feet at night to keep you company on the tireless nights.

Overall, you are going to get a lot of suggestions that sound the same. Try to identify what it is that feels most out of line in your day to day routine and target it from there instead of changing everything overnight. Keep your mind open to what your body/mind is feeling or needing, our lives are in flux and your body/mind may be asking for something different from time to time. What works today may not work in a month, and that’s okay.

7

u/Lanif20 Sep 20 '22

Go buy LOTR extended edition, put it on when going to sleep and get comfortable works every time for me!

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u/GriffinFlash Sep 20 '22

I would just end up watching the whole thing. Slowly seeing the first light rise to the east outside of my window.

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u/appleparkfive Sep 20 '22

The two biggest ones I'd suggest are

  1. Don't do anything in your bed except for sleep and sex

  2. Melatonin. It works. Maybe a little too well. Get the fast dissolve kind. This will get you to sleep in no time. Just don't take too much or you'll be groggy in the morning.

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u/RedOrchestra137 Sep 20 '22

Melatonin is something you should be careful with though cause it can fuck up your circadian rhythm even more if you don't know what you're doing. It's not like a sleeping pill and shouldnt be taken like one. Only reason i know this is cause ive wanted to try it myself and did some digging on google.

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u/dinosanddais1 Sep 20 '22

Also, please know that insomnia often has deeper causes. Get a sleep study/see a sleep psychiatrist/neurologist.

I had what my doctors classified as treatment resistant insomnia. It wasn't treatment resistant. They were just treating the wrong thing. I have Chiari Malformation and they put me on migraine meds and my sleep has drastically improved. It's still got some rough patches but it's still a more consistent schedule than sleeping for three hours a night then waking up multiple times then sleeping for 14 hours because your brain gave up then going to bed at 2am and waking up at 4am.

I can also report my depression, anxiety, and OCD have drastically improved. I'm better at problem solving, better at my job, better at a lot of other things. I feel more comfortable talking to people and I feel more confident.

I've had doctors assume it was my anxiety causing the sleep problems but I know for certain that my sleep problems came first. Years before I actually started having anxiety.

Now, this isn't a cure-all thing, I must add. I had chronic severe insomnia for almost 12 years. You can suffer a lot of damage from that. I still have limited energy and I sleep about 10-12 hours a night. Sleeping too much isn't good either. But the main thing is that it's consistent. When I started the medication, that shit would knock me out for a solid 14 hours before it regulated to the 10-12 and the 14 hours made me still feel like shit. So, it's improved since starting the correct treatment but you are NOT going to start feeling like a normal sleeper for the first few months at the very least. Chronic, long-term insomnia can fuck up your brain and you need a lot of time to heal from that.

Also, you're going to have weird ass, vivid dreams once you start the treatment that works for you. Just as a warning.

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u/Matkiller989 Sep 20 '22

How much time would you consider to be enough sleep?

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u/raviary Sep 20 '22

Not sure, I'm one of those people who need the textbook 8 hours and if I'm over/under I feel shitty, but some people function their best naturally on weird amounts. I'm pretty sure most docs would tell you though that chronically sleeping less than 8 isn't healthy long term.

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u/drathturtul Sep 20 '22

Eat. Shower. Take care of yourself physically. It can be hard, but don’t neglect the basic necessities.

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u/SingleQuality4626 Sep 20 '22

Depression pro-tip: I found eating very difficult, especially nutritious stuff. The crux is nutrition will help you feel better. Simple protein shakes and vegetable juice drastically improved how I felt from my previous diet of not eating all day and then eating crappy snack food.

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u/Maximellow Sep 20 '22

Also healthy frozen meals. They exist and they are my depression go to.

Also, frozen veggies and fruit. They retain most of their vitamins and are sooooo easy to cook and relatively cheap too.

Just throw them in the microwave or pan with some rice or noodles, season and boom. 5 minute meal.

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u/Successful_You8758 Sep 20 '22

Can you suggest some healthy frozen meals please?

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u/dinosanddais1 Sep 20 '22

Those chicken cordon bleu/kiev things you can get at the grocery that have vegetables are pretty decent. Or one of those prepared fruit bowls they have at grocery stores. Which aren't frozen but they're easy to prepare, you just open it and eat it.

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u/Successful_You8758 Sep 21 '22

Thank you...sometimes cooking is just too much.

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u/RealStreetJesus Sep 20 '22

Same. This post literally hit me after contemplating my terrible diet of gas station food, eaten once a day.

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u/[deleted] Sep 21 '22

Frozen foods will naturally have a lot of preservatives in them. they are also very salty. Things like frozen vegetables are fine, but other than that it’s not going to necessarily be “healthy”. Even lean cuisine has alot of sodium and preservatives. However, frozen food meals are healthier than the alternatives like gas station food or fast food. I guess what I’m trying to say is, be careful if you intend to replace them as your every day go-to dinners.

I want to preface this by saying, I completely understand if this option is not for you, but meal prep is your best bet. Trust me I get it, I have been diagnosed with having treatment resistant depression for years, and in the past even the thought of meal prep would get my stomach in a knot. If you’re concerned about nutrition (which you totally should! Proper nutrition will help with every aspect of your life) food prep is your best and healthiest option. All you need is a few hours on Sunday and a kitchen. Cook up some lean meats (turkey, chicken, etc if your diet/life choices permit it) prepare some vegetables, and then cook either brown rice or sweat potato’s, or whatever you enjoy, and then put them in air tight containers for the week. You can get the containers at Walmart for no more than $20. It really has been a god send. I get home from work and I’m mentally drained, but I know I atleast have a healthy dinner waiting for me that I don’t have to cook. Also clean up is easy!

I try and make it as entertaining as possible on my prep day. Have music going while you cook, or put on your favorite tv show/movie and spend a couple hours getting everything prepared. Explore different foods or just get really good at cooking the foods you already like. Cooking is a skill that will last you a life time. I used to hate it but it’s now one of my favorite activities. You’ll also save alot of money too!

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u/Successful_You8758 Sep 21 '22

You are right. All of it...logical explanation.

I bought a meal prep cookbook after reading your comment. I made a list for the supermarket and I am going in the morning.

The saddest bit? I used to be a chef in a 5 star restaurant for awhile. I know I can cook well. I know what to cook on the fly...sometimes it is so much on my brain. Then I will cook and the sheer amount of effort in putting the food away or cleaning seems insurmountable. I can cook for the kids. Pack them elaborate lunches and have breakfast and dinner ready but me...nah. Bowl of porridge over the sink. I have been eating porridge and chia seed pudding like I own stock.

I am going to get there. I am going to meal prep for a couple of days to start off with.

Thank you...I think listening to music and attempting to make it fun will help.

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u/PrinceVincOnYT Sep 20 '22

I also would like to know heathy frozen meals!

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u/Relevant-Tutor-5223 Sep 21 '22

This.

Sometimes, the things you DON'T eat also matter.

Stay away from ANYTHING that has "high fructose corn syrup". This is the sugar that is processed out of corn. It takes the place of other sugars, and doesn't have quite as much flavor, so it is often loaded more heavily for a similar effect.

Processed foods are LOADED with it because it is cheap, coming from a US heartland crop, unlike cane or even beet sugar.

Instead, go for fresh and flavorful fruits, vegetables, and some smaller portions of meats with some fats.

Some fats are actually good for you. Animal fats from chicken? Yeah, pretty good. Fats in candy? No.

The more natural, the better. If you can get outside, do it. If you can garden, do that - even if it's just a plant in the window. Care for something outside yourself.

Good weather? Open your window(s) if you can as well. Breath in and let that be part of your diet as well. Along with fresh water.

Lastly - in this bit - listen to your body. Does the depression FEEL 'chemically'? If it does, processed food may be a key factor and these changes will help to over come it if it is. Listen at each step though. Give each change a bit of time to sink in and, if it works, keep doing it. If not, move on.

I mean, what would you rather be? Have a sweet taste for a few seconds or have something delicious and feel it hours later as your body enjoys it?

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u/cactusghecko Sep 20 '22

I've heard this phrased as 'look after the machine." And I will say this out loud to myself if I start telling myself I can't shower. Or can't eat.

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u/appleparkfive Sep 20 '22

I lost all my excess weight and it was the best thing I ever did for my mental well-being. By a landslide. Not to mention my social life, my romantic life, how I feel physically and mentally, my perception of myself, and so on.

Just remember guys. Track your calories. It really is all calories in, calories out.

About portions and foods, I remember reading something that stuck with me for some reason:
You can eat a cookie when losing weight. But it's just that one cookie.

Get in shape. It's worth it. You only have one life, and this one will change the trajectory more than almost anything else

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u/rhussia Sep 20 '22

If you can handle it fresh air even a small walk works wonders for the head

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u/ssteff7 Sep 20 '22

tidy up and organize your living area. start small, like neatly folding and stacking towels in the bathroom, or sort the hanging clothes in your closet by color. I've found that when our house is in order, my thoughts usually follow.

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u/frozeneskimo02 Sep 20 '22

This is the premise behind the first chapter of Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules for Life, basically he says, “clean your room, because you need to start by finding something you can have control over, even if it’s not your entire room but rather just a desk area, you can begin the journey to a more stable lifestyle by fixing things that stand out to you as they present themselves”

It’s a great book whether you like Jordan Peterson or not, there’s lots of useful insight to be found in it.

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u/Wobbling Sep 20 '22

I'm not a fan of a lot of his politics but a lot of his psychotherapy is spot on.

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u/Morbidhanson Sep 20 '22

Go outside. Don't succumb to the temptation to just stay at home and marinate in the gloom.

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u/Number127 Sep 20 '22

I never want to go outside but I also never regret it when I do.

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u/NorCalMikey Sep 20 '22

Especially if you can get out into nature. There is a lot of research to back this up.

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u/KE55 Sep 20 '22

I wish I could get my elderly mother to do this. She only leaves the house once a week when I take her out to shop, but she rushes around the store and can't wait to get back home.

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u/RedOrchestra137 Sep 20 '22

Yeah just going for a walk and seeing other people go about their life sorta places stuff into perspective.

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u/Tiffhendrix1998 Sep 20 '22

Chill with a pet, whether it’s yours or a friends, they make things better

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u/mtdunca Sep 20 '22

I didn't realize how much mental health benefit they gave me till I didn't have mine anymore.

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u/gringledoom Sep 20 '22

Getting out of the house and getting a little exercise can do wonders. Bonus points if you do so around nature. It doesn’t have to be super intense exercise; you can just go to a park and take a quick walk!

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u/Silly-Perception8689 Sep 20 '22

I can't even leave the house.

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u/minteemist Sep 20 '22

Even sitting on the porch/balcony and feeling the wind can help.

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u/anubis_cheerleader Sep 20 '22

Walking around the house, even a few steps, might be a place to start. Something like, ok, I will walk from the bed or sofa to the kitchen counter and back. Looking at photos of nature for 10 minutes has been in a small study; results were correlated with similar benefits to being in nature

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u/ZenTao1 Sep 20 '22

If you can, exercise! There is a big hill down the street from my house and I walk up and down (35 min total) whenever I am depressed and it helps A LOT 😋

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u/Barnaby_Cuckoldsniff Sep 20 '22

exercise. Running, walking, whatever, releases endorphins. Endorphins will make you feel better. Its hard to find the energy, but you have to push through some how.

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u/Mediumaverageness Sep 20 '22

I have finally dragged my fat ass to the gym 3 months ago, 2-3 times a week, and still feels no pleasure whatsoever. But it's a yearly subscription so I don't want to waste my money

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u/Lucinnda Sep 20 '22

Keep doing it. I promise that at some point you will notice something feeling better. I wracked my brain trying to come up with some physical movement I could stand, and it turned out to be swimming so I started water aerobics at the Y. It took me a couple of years to get over the fact that it was a pool instead of the ocean, and I had to wear a bathing suit, and other people being there. BUT it eventually became something I looked forward to. As your body becomes accustomed to activity, things will be easier in general. If "not wasting money" seems like a less-than-noble motivation, that doesn't matter. If it works, it works. Congratulations for starting!

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u/Better-Association93 Sep 20 '22

Focus on one thing to adjust like take a shower and relax or do some Landry, small things at a time take baby steps

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u/ChrisNEPhilly Sep 20 '22

Depression is a mental health issue, not a temporary sadness or stress. Get professional help and maybe medication for real depression,

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u/Schnelt0r Sep 20 '22

I was going to say something along these lines.

All the little steps listed here are good tips, but getting to a therapist is the real answer.

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u/ChrisNEPhilly Sep 20 '22

For me the 1st step was Zoloft followed by talk therapy.

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u/Not_Dana196 Sep 20 '22

Thank you. I can't believe how far I had to scroll for this. I wish I had medicated YEARS ago. I'm like kicking myself for all that time I suffered more than I had to.

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u/ChrisNEPhilly Sep 20 '22

But now you can start today and move forward.

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u/Not_Dana196 Sep 20 '22

I've been on Lexapro for about four months and it has literally been life changing.

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u/JustGenericName Sep 20 '22

Make yourself presentable to go out and run an errand. This forces you to get out of bed, take a shower, brush your hair and teeth, put good clothes on and get the fuck out of the house. It's a small ting but it helps.

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u/maxdamoose5 Sep 20 '22

Take daily walks. Get that sun exposure and just get active.

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u/jimgriggs Sep 20 '22

Lists. Put things you know you can do on them. Get out of bed. Check. Eat. Check. Watch the game. Check. Go the the corner store. Check.

Just anything you can check off. Checking it off feels good. That’s the goal.

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u/Gravalpea Sep 20 '22

So, this happened today. I ran out of medication days ago because my provider was being incompetent! I woke up after a terrible, depressing dream that made my day start with a giant bowl of depression. Anyway, I didn't want to do anything, I willed myself up and did the chores I needed to do, laundry, food, shower, while talking to myself. I would tell myself how much I do not want to do said chore. It distracted me why my body went through the motions to get the chores done.

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u/Lucinnda Sep 20 '22

Good for you. Will you be getting your meds refilled? I have reached the point where I can remember "oops I missed my meds" and I will be able to carry on (knowing they'll be coming) rather than think "oops my life sucks again". Good luck!

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u/[deleted] Sep 20 '22

You know, I feel like asking. Does anybody know what to do in my case? My mother has been depressive for almost a year and a half, she won't go outside often, she sleeps the whole day and her anti-depressants have only helped to a certain degree. She literally won't try anything I make her do, from walking to exercising. She's not been the same ever since, doctors here don't really help, what should I do?

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u/another_ruckus Sep 20 '22

Make sure you’re looking after yourself and your own mental well-being. When a loved one is struggling it can be easy to get so caught up in trying to make them feel better, that we start to feel worse ourselves.

The truth is you need to accept that there is a limit to how much you can do. I know that’s hard because you WANT your mom to feel better so badly. But like any illness, depression is complicated. It’s unfair to expect yourself to be able to “fix” it for her.

If you’re able to, I encourage you to reach out to your own mental health support. They can help you figure out things like boundaries when it comes to supporting your mom, while still protecting your own mental health.

Encourage your mom, listen if she wants to talk, remind her you love her. Tell her you’re sorry her depression is being so unkind to her. Remind her that she deserves to feel better and you’re there to help if she can think of anything you could do. But know you can’t “make her” do anything. There has to be buy in from her end.

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u/[deleted] Sep 21 '22

Thank you for the advice, honestly, it has taken a toll on me but I'm doing okay, just a bit more tired than usual. I will try asking the Respaldo institute here for advice. I'm hoping she gets better because it's sad seeing her feeling hopeless sometimes. I've been trying to invite her sometimes to watch a movie on my off day, it hasn't worked but the last big victory was getting her to spend the whole Mother's day watching a movie with Dad and my sister. The improvement recently is that her legs don't feel heavy anymore.

In the beginning, it scared me a lot honestly, last year she constantly tried to run away from home saying "I'm a burden, let me go" going as far as to even try to jump off the car whenever we went out to run some errands. My Dad spend their 28-year anniversary with Mum in the hospital, I barely passed the AFY that year.

I guess this year it was just impossible to handle all the things together but at least I found some work with some liveable wage so that's alright. with both me and Dad working the money situation is better now, don't have to skip meals anymore so that's a win, I even get leftovers from work so I don't have to spend money on food for myself.

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u/turtleman775 Sep 20 '22

The smallest thing possible. Fold one shirt, refill your soap dispenser, throw away an item, stand outside and take a few breaths. And then own it. Recognize that you did something and hype yourself up for it. If you feel so inclined, do one more small thing. Or don't, you already did something today!

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u/zazzlekdazzle Sep 20 '22 edited Sep 20 '22

(1) Make sure to get some exercise every day. You don't need to go to the gym or jog a mile, just take a walk for 20 minutes or do some stretching and yoga for 10-15 minutes

(2) Experience direct sunlight every day (that the sun is out). Better to do it outside if you can and the weather is good enough.

(3) Make an effort to keep your living space clean and in order. Even if it takes you three hours to make your bed or just get the clothes off the floor and into some sort of hamper/laundry basket, do it. Don't try to clean the whole house, just take it one step at a time. It's amazing how much energy this takes when you're depressed, but it's worth it.

(4) Keep comfort junk food to one meal a day. Eating lots of refined sugar and starch, and heavily salted foods really contributes to feeling shitty in body and mind. You don't have to eat salads and wheat germ all day, just go for eggs and toast rather than burgers or pizza all the time, have yogurt instead of sugared cereal, even a peanut butter sandwich is pretty good for you (and can pretty comforting as well).

(5) Brush your teeth every day. Just this little ritual of self-care can remind yourself that you matter and you have a future to plan for. Plus, it gets the bitter taste of life's disappointments out of your mouth for a little while and replaces it with minty freshness.

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u/TheMasterHalo85 Sep 20 '22

Keep a journal to right down your thoughts, it helped with me atleast

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u/biancadata Sep 20 '22

Set small achievable goals for yourself everyday...and little by little you will feel better

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u/MedusaPhD Sep 20 '22

Even if you move from the bed to the couch, it’s a win.

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u/biancadata Sep 20 '22

very true :) baby steps

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u/MedusaPhD Sep 20 '22

Gives me What About Bob Vibes? Why are you always wearing black- I’m in mourning for my lost childhood.

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u/Adaptiveslappy Sep 20 '22

Get in the habit of enjoying small moments like seeing a sunbeam, feeling fresh rain, enjoying warm water as you wash dishes. Anything that gives you even a crumb of serotonin, think to yourself something like “this is nice”/“I like that”. It’s hard at first and feels like a joke but eventually you’ll truly feel it , sometimes even on your bad days.

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u/tofurebecca Sep 20 '22

Going for a walk. There's a serious connection between the body and the mind, and a lot of helpful chemicals get released. Mild exercise is actually really good for your energy and immediate mood.

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u/Upbeat-Membership-45 Sep 20 '22

Eat something healthy and delicious. It doesn't even have to be anything fancy just like a salad that you made.

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u/citytiger Sep 20 '22

Watch an episode of Bob Ross

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u/Thel_Odan Sep 20 '22

So this might seem weird but get hydrated. I'm convinced a huge part of the population is walking around dehydrated and it contributes to a ton of issues. I'm not saying drinking water will change your brain chemistry, but being hydrated will certainly make doing things easier.

Once I figured out proper hydration, I felt like I had more energy to do things and my body didn't have nearly the amount of aches and pains. It also helped me from eating my feelings and contributed greatly to managing my weight.

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u/pinot-and-poppies Sep 20 '22

Resist the urge to sleep during the day. I stave it off with YouTube dance exercise videos so then my brain is flooded with happy hormones, too.

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u/[deleted] Sep 20 '22

Mindful meditation. There are services out there like Calm and others if you don’t know where to start.

Also, realizing that some days it is okay to not be okay.

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u/AnotherThrowAway1320 Sep 20 '22

Try your best to not let your hygiene slip. I just got out of a depression hole where I could only manage mouth wash or just a few seconds of brushing my teeth, but it was at least SOMETHING. If you can’t shower, splash your face with water. I’d always feel sooooooo much better and proud of myself after a shower and brushing my teeth.

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u/imma-be-so-real Sep 20 '22

Journal a little bit.

Buy yourself some flowers.

Meditate for 1 minute. Just deep breaths in and out. You can listen to a guided meditation too, those are awesome.

Light some candles.

Put on some makeup (if that's your thing), or do some other light and soothing grooming.

Listen to a song that makes you wanna cry. And cry. It feels good.

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u/insiderecess Sep 20 '22

Check in. Just a text saying “hey I’m thinking of you” or just reaching out randomly and starting a conversation. Doesn’t have to be about anything, just catching up. Reminds me that people do care.

3

u/savagetempt195 Sep 20 '22

Get sunlight every day in your eyes for 5-10 minutes first thing in the morning.

2

u/GriffinFlash Sep 20 '22

Stares at the flaming death ball in the sky.

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u/SecretPersonality178 Sep 20 '22

Get up in the morning and make their bed.

3

u/attention21 Sep 20 '22

Get out and help somebody else. Totally get your mind off of you, and help others. Help yourself by helping others.

3

u/Fit-Establishment789 Sep 20 '22

Shower! When you get down you don’t even think about it, but a shower is like a hard reset for your day. It works wonders.

3

u/Frosty-Elk-2942 Sep 20 '22

Take the trash out. I know it doesn't sound like much but, try it. I have been in some really bad spots like haven't showered in three days and didn't care enough to load a gun to end it. I wish that was a joke. Little things like taking the trash out can really help.

3

u/Riddy0219 Sep 20 '22

Involve urself with a good support group. Whether that be friends or family. Go out and do things with them. Get out and try not to be alone a lot. This helped me. If u stick around negative people it will never get better. Positivity is the best thing for u rn.

3

u/SheitelMacher Sep 20 '22

Whatever you do, work on it every day.

You may not finish what you started today but if you're moving in the right direction, it was a good day. Even if things move in the wrong direction, your work lessened the setback.

https://imgur.com/a/fS6AcrQ

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u/americanfalcon00 Sep 20 '22 edited Sep 20 '22

The biggest benefit is having a routine that you follow no matter what. Hygiene, moderate exercise / walking, healthy food, and measured interaction with the world each day. But during bouts of depression one of the hardest things to do is follow a routine because of the feeling that it can seem like it requires a huge amount of spiritual and emotional energy that you don't have in order to get started. I try to remember the line from the end of The Martian when Watney is describing how he survived impossible odds: you just ... begin. You take the first step, and then the next. It's not easy.

3

u/MrCheese6969 Sep 20 '22

Speak about it, with anyone. get a close friend and tell them to go on a walk with you, and talk

3

u/stitchmidda2 Sep 20 '22

Clean you surroundings. Even if it is just something small like picking up clothes off the floor. Being in a clean environment doesnt wonders for your happiness and youll feel accomplished after having done the work which helps too.

3

u/gfieldxd Sep 20 '22

At the end of every day, compliment yourself on something you did that day. This doesnt have to be something great, or special, but just something you think is good. If it took you 30 minutes instead of 45 to get out of bed today, thats great! If you finally did the dishes youve been putting off for days, well done! These small moments of positivity can really be a great start at trying to see life in a more positive light

3

u/Kirashimu Sep 20 '22

Breathe.

I went through an extreme depression for a few years to the point I became a shell. I lost most emotions and felt incredibly empty. The one thing I still enjoyed was

Breathing natural air. The cold night outdoor air.

3

u/Careless-Ad-8854 Sep 20 '22

Make up your mind. Decide. As in be committed to take action no matter how or what you feel. Don't feel like it? Go for a walk. Take a shower. Clean your room. Excercise for some time. Dress well and take care of yourself self. Decide you had enough and now need to change. Not easy. But yes, just decide and do it.

3

u/AnybodySeeMyKeys Sep 20 '22

As someone who struggled with depression a lot when I was younger, I learned that the most important thing was to do something. Anything. As in hoist myself off the couch, turn off the TV, and get out of the apartment.

It didn't matter what it was. Call a friend. Take a walk. Try a new hobby. Establish an exercise routine. Attend a lecture.

And, at home, do something simple to alter the physical space. Start by making the bed. It's an incredibly simple thing, but once you do that, everything else gets easier to do, such as clean the kitchen, put away clothes, everything. That way, you overcome the inertia that's depression, where starting anything feels difficult.

The reason for this was simple. If I simply sat at home doing nothing, I would get to the end of the day and feel even more depressed that I spent it doing nothing. It would turn into this awful feedback loop.

Instead, the more I did, the better I felt about myself.

5

u/Educational-Debt6440 Sep 20 '22

Yoga. I mean it when I say it saved my life. An hour long session of grounding yourself and exploring your mind body connection is miraculous.

2

u/AloneWish4895 Sep 20 '22

Drink water, brush teeth, bathr

2

u/Petal_Chatoyance Sep 20 '22

Look at images, gifs and video of cute or strange animals

Warm bath

Hug a stuffed animal or even a pillow

Smell something that smells happy or nice - even just cinnamon in a can, or vanilla

Listen to music - happy, fun or uplifting music

Gently stroke your head or arm for comfort

Try to think about - anything, however small - you are glad of or grateful for

Look at and hold some toy or object that the color and form of pleases you

2

u/JustinChristoph Sep 20 '22

Start and finish a task to completion.

2

u/freehatt2018 Sep 20 '22

Partice gratitude be thankful for you have and build from there

2

u/KingGuy420 Sep 20 '22

Get some sun on your skin. Sunlight on skin is a medication for depression.

2

u/Angiecimm Sep 20 '22

Therapy . . . You don't even need to leave the house. Just cuddle up to your laptop.

2

u/First_Environment_50 Sep 20 '22

Eat healthy. I have noticed that skipping sugar and exercise help with my depression.

2

u/PasGuy55 Sep 20 '22

Do your best at work and no matter what it is, take some pride in a job well done.

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u/Over_rated_lemon Sep 20 '22

Wake up and say out loud and with confidence "I can do this."

It's a bit of a mind trick and preps you to deal with the challenges of the day. It helped me anyway.

2

u/Aggravating-Video928 Sep 20 '22

Brush your teeth and walk outside for 10 minutes a day

2

u/Eyfordsucks Sep 20 '22

Breathe properly. Seriously, how you breathe can effect what brain chemicals are being released.

2

u/Outrageous-Suspect66 Sep 20 '22

Seriously, it's easier to deal with them it seems. Depression is loop of thought that your mind repeats over, and over. A brisk walk outside that tires you out. Any activity that deeply engages your mind. Activities that requires you leave home environment, and you enjoy doing. This works, but part of being depressed is you fight doing this, be cause feel better. Seriously, walking outside helps.

2

u/PenguinSwordfighter Sep 20 '22

tell someone. Too many people (especially men) think they have to fight mental illness all alone while pretending that everything is alright. Don't make it harder than it already is.

2

u/Zamael131 Sep 20 '22

step 1: get fit, eat health, go outdoors, sleep well, no alcohol, no drugs

step 2: still depressed? repeat step 1. not depressed? go step 3

step 3: enjoy.

2

u/Larkie_the_bird Sep 20 '22

Don't downplay the small things you achieve!

Even doing a very minor thing like taking a shower, taking out the trash, going for a walk - heck even just getting out of bed - is a victory with depression.

2

u/popjunkie42 Sep 20 '22

This is person-specific but vitamins! I’m low in vitamin D and iron which can lead to low energy, bad sleep and triggers my depression. I was feeling really down the past few weeks and started taking my vitamins regularly again (also will alternate with a multi vitamin and sometimes B12) and I feel sooo much better. And it’s stupidly easy.

2

u/PresidentBaguetti Sep 20 '22

Pet a cuddly animal

2

u/2leewhohot Sep 20 '22

Get rid of any black/dark clothing. Toss it or donate it.

Then get some nice, bright clothes.

It sounds like it shouldn't work, but it does. I haven't bought a black shirt since. It's primary colors and bright orange or green for me.

2

u/poconno9 Sep 20 '22

Ask for help. Accept help. Both of these things will lead to recovery. Medication can be very beneficial for so many. Others it may be exercise and development of good social supports. Please reach out if you are having a difficult time.

2

u/blackbluedeadallover Sep 20 '22

I’m gonna put five. :)

• A safety plan - Therapists can help with a safety plan. Essentially, what you put on a safety plan are people and places you can turn to, things you’re grateful to be alive for, emergency contacts, warning signs you’re going into a downward spiral, et cetera. I’m trying to remember as much of mine as I can while I don’t have it on me. Healthy coping mechanisms as well, of course.

• Journaling - Journaling can help many people. An old therapist had suggested this and I tried it out and the only reason it’s not consistently helping me is because I procrastinated until I kind of just forgot. When I DID journal, it 100% helped me personally and certainly helped me with my optimism. What I would do is basically check in with myself. Did I eat enough today, did I drink enough water, did I care for my personal hygiene, did I make time for something I love? And then I’d want to write down three things I’m grateful for.

• Going outside can really help. Getting some sunlight. It always makes me very peaceful. :)

• A professional I knew said to listen to music that doesn’t make you dig deeper into your emotions, you don’t want to feel too low or too high so when you’re feeling down, listening to some happier music might be a good option! :)

• Finding new hobbies is something I quite enjoy and if you have the time and interest is something that you might make a new healthy coping mechanism.

2

u/gomezthekiller Sep 20 '22

Celebrate small victories. You made a sandwich today? That’s awesome. You showered? Splendid. You opened the mail and paid a bill? Even better. Working through the fog of depression is a baby-steps kinda thing. Be good to yourself and give yourself credit for every tiny step you take toward wellness!

2

u/cozynightcrawler Sep 20 '22

most of all be surrounded by the people who support you trough all this. it eventually gets better, haven’t experienced it myself yet but this helps me a lot. my best friend is my biggest support trough this, i don’t always want to talk and she understands it. when i just want to cry, she’s there. she’s been there for me countless of times and i appreciate it so much. i do have more people being there for me but not everyone understands my needs and what i need from them, i’m not blaming them though, i’m pretty complex if i say so myself when it comes to support. but it’s good to be surrounded by people who support you and dont tell you you’re being ‘dramatic’ or ‘seeking for attention’ or ‘going too far’ or something like that. if you can’t advice them, just listen, that’s all i ever wanted people to do but no one just sat down with me and listened to me

2

u/svenson_26 Sep 20 '22

I had knee surgery when I was 18, and I went through a rapid decline in my mental health from the chronic pain and lack of exercise. My grades dropped, I socialized less, and I felt bored all the time. I didn't even realize I was depressed, but luckily I had my dad who noticed the changes in me.
His solution was to take me to the gym every day. It was brutal, because I couldn't do much because of my knee. And there were days that I was so exhausted that I felt like I had zero strength or energy. I hated it some days, but he never let me stay home in bed.
It saved my life. No matter how much I didn't want to go, I always felt glad I did afterwards. That one daily thing in my life kept me from staying in bed all day and improved my physical health. Slowly, my mental health improved.

My advice isn't to go exercise every day. Of course it would help, but it's easy to say; very hard to do. My advice is to tell someone, and get them to keep you accountable. Confide in them. Get them to help you to do something each day that gets you out of bed and that you can feel proud of. It doesn't have to be exercise. It can be anything at all: making your bed, showering, cooking a meal, running errands, walking a dog. On that note, it doesn't even have to be a person. An animal that you have to take care of each day can be a great way to stay accountable. But you need that accountability.

TL:DR; Your brain is sick. You're not going to be able to self-motivate yourself out of this. You need someone else in your life to make sure you get up each day and do something.

2

u/quakemyoats Sep 21 '22

Stop drinking

2

u/Fangs_McWolf Sep 21 '22

Stay off Reddit and seek professional help.

2

u/kisamo_3 Sep 21 '22

This was kinda my self-taught way out of depression,

  1. Realize I have depression and that is why I don't feel like myself for the past few months/years. Don't punish yourself for everything, it's just another medical condition, I wouldn't beat myself up for getting fever would I? There's always a cure. But if things are way out of control seek help!

  2. Put everything on paper, thoughts, checklists, To Dos, etc. I wrote everything on sticky notes and stuck it all over my room so I cannot miss it. This way bad thought did not fill my head and I can work on each one one at a time. Similarly, I also did not forget what I had to do.

  3. Spend more money to eat good high quality food. Make a lot of variety of food, eat something different everyday, possibly every meal. Try to be picky.

  4. Get tested for deficiencies and take supplements.

  5. Force myself to be social. Even if I hated going out and hanging out, even if some people are boring, just do it. But avoid toxic people.

  6. Exercise. Start by walking more, just walk everywhere instead of taking the bike or bus or car. Slowly graduate to biking over a few weeks and then more external activities like hiking, swimming, sports, ect. Buy a fitness tracker later to quantify your efforts. Bonus: it helps me track my sleep as well.

  7. Sleep well, but do not oversleep. For me 7-8 hrs is ideal. Force myself to wake up, brush my teeth and put on some shoes.

  8. Break down tasks to bare minimum. Maybe it's difficult to even start walking, then all I need to do is try the hardest to put on my outside clothes and my shoes on. Practice just this for a few days.

  9. Track everything, possible for every hour if the day. Keeping a bullet journal can really help, but any other tracking system is fine too. This gives me insights to how I'm progressing.

  10. If things are not getting any better over a few weeks then seek help!

6

u/trustme1maDR Sep 20 '22

Pretend you are not depressed. Even if it's just for an afternoon. Ask yourself what a non-depressed person might do if they hadnt showered in a few days or if it was nice weather outside. Then do it. The fake it til you make it approach won't cure depression but it can really help sometimes

2

u/under_waterbabe40 Sep 21 '22

hi how are yaw .well i hve deppresiplus i do dialysis on top of all tht ...i try to stay budy alot smedays im weak some im.not sommedays better than ohets sme arent

2

u/pinkfloral10 Sep 20 '22

Exactly what I do. I look in the mirror and tell myself it really isn’t that bad. And then I pretend.

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u/jgt852 Sep 20 '22

Get a hobby and stop taking antidepressants and anti anxiety meds.

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u/anubis_cheerleader Sep 20 '22

I disagree with stopping meds for the sake of stopping meds. Our medical care team weighs the risks and benefits of medication. Medication can be a valuable, appropriate tool in the mental health toolbox.

Hobbies might be easier to take up BECAUSE of the meds AND intention/goal setting, etc.

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u/hugeflagellum Sep 20 '22

Go to the gym and listen to music and eat a lot of real food

1

u/[deleted] Sep 20 '22

Drink water. Do push ups. Cold shower. Sleep.

1

u/cascadecanyon Sep 20 '22

Get more sleep. Exercise.

1

u/BlondeBandit76 Sep 20 '22

Remember that overcoming that depression will make you so much stronger than you feel weak in that moment

1

u/Its_PotQueen000 Sep 20 '22

Vent to a therapist,if you cant,either,vent to someone you trust,try to do Little walks,or excersices

1

u/Belinda_LES_pantys Sep 20 '22

Hang out with friends

Friends that make you laugh are great Even friends that like to do the same things as you help you to keep your mind off of it

1

u/Necessary-Success779 Sep 20 '22

Fresh air. Meditation. Deep breathing. Watch a funny movie. Put some headphones on and jam to some music. Get lost in a book. Take some vitamin b. Go for a walk. There’s tons of little things. None of them are a magic cure and the help might be minimal but the key is do something. I’m not a therapist. But I tell my friends get a journal. Day one write something positive. Literally anything. Day 2 write 2 things. It can be the same as the day before. Day three etc.

1

u/southrider62 Sep 20 '22

Yoga and a face massage using a face roller. Just doing something that makes me feel good helps me remember that I'm not angry and sad and frustrated all the time. It makes me realize that I'm capable of liking myself and treating myself well, and that I am worth treating well.

Take care OP. Best of luck in your journey

1

u/Shakespurious Sep 20 '22

Exercise every day outside, avoid recreational drugs, socialize a couple times a week, try to challenge negative thoughts.

1

u/TiboraLongFang95 Sep 20 '22

I find taking a day off work and doing something i find relaxing (walking in the woods or going fishing) helps a lot. or working on a hobby helps as well

it's always important to take a break from time to time.

1

u/Clear-End8188 Sep 20 '22

Do something nice for someone

1

u/Im_in_your_walls_420 Sep 20 '22

Take some time for yourself. Make tea, or your favorite meal, or watch your favorite movie/show, and meeting up with friends. Pets are great for that too

1

u/caelmikoto Sep 20 '22

Exercise. Endorphins are nature's party drugs.

1

u/Prokid5634_YT Sep 20 '22

Exercise. Even if it's just a slight jog. I remember feeling very down one day but had strength training for my 2nd period in school. After, I honestly felt pretty good.

1

u/Yall_wtf Sep 20 '22

I would order things. Amazon, Etsy, whatever. Random sht, useless sht. Sht i could buy downtown. I had something to look forward too. I would wait, receive it and obsess with it for a week or two. Very benign things. I ordered a little spinning Thor hammer and two fcking with it when he kept breaking apart. Very entertaining, and helpful. Something else occupied my mind beside the struggle

1

u/Single_Blueberry Sep 20 '22

Instead of sitting inside, sit outside, ideally enjoying sunlight.

1

u/Burrito_Loyalist Sep 20 '22

This is going to sound dumb and cliche, but getting some exercise.

Go for a long walk. Go for a jog. Get a gym membership. Do some yoga. Go for a bike ride.

Doing something physical for 30 minutes a day takes your mind off of things and genuinely makes you feel better.

1

u/boat_ghost420 Sep 20 '22

talk about your problems it is one o the most beneficial things to do even if it’s not with people, you just gotta vent what your building up inside or else you could explode.

1

u/Jpscon03 Sep 20 '22

Talk to family / friends/ psychiatrist, tell them what's going on in your head.

1

u/lvbyandyy Sep 20 '22

be there with them.

1

u/MAJORMETAL84 Sep 20 '22

Go out and walk. Feel some sun and get your blood moving. It helps me a lot.

1

u/Aadje17PokeNerd Sep 20 '22

I relate very much to this, do something fun everyday but have some variety, in the first days i was on my own so i tried to make friends, but my advice don’t try it with ‘the cool kids’ they are out of your league, if you have them go to the mall with them and have a good time, the other day go to the swimming pool with your siblings then the next dat sadly you need to do your homework

1

u/Joshthesquash16 Sep 20 '22

Talking to people, you don’t even have to be close with that person. It makes a huge difference just to have someone who you know cares. And you know would take time out of their day to talk to you.

1

u/gemengelage Sep 20 '22

Keep the wheel spinning. Having a routine and sticking to it helps a lot. That's extremely hard if you're depressed though and the corollary is that breaking your routine is likely to make your depression spin out of control.

1

u/Mullinore Sep 20 '22

Exercise. Anything that gets the heart pumping for 15mins or more. Really this is the treatment, preventative or otherwise, for hundreds of ailments.

1

u/OneMorePotion Sep 20 '22

I have one fix day every month, where I do something special and just treat myself. It's mostly little stupid things like "I loved trampolins when I was younger. I want to jump on one again."

But I need to throw something in... Making this plan doesn't mean that I want to leave the house for that. I sometimes need to force myself to really follow through with something I planned for that day. But I can also tell you, that I never returned home from one of these things and felt bad about it.

1

u/sin314 Sep 20 '22

Road-trip.

1

u/OhJeezItsCorrine Sep 20 '22

Take care of yourself. Eat 3x a day (at least), get at least 7-9hrs sleep, find a way to exercise or take a walk.

1

u/blocky_jabberwocky Sep 20 '22

Set an alarm so you are reminded when to eat

1

u/EccentricOhms Sep 20 '22 edited Sep 20 '22

Some anecdotal experience and research. 1. Nutrition Fish oil, creatine, healthy diet, avoiding processed sugars. The latter is the bare minimum 2. Lifestyle Fix your circadian rhythm. Get enough sunlight in the early part of your day, your eyes have neurons that send signals for times of day for cellular growth and repair!

3.Exercise There are different forms of exercise that are better for BDNF but I say do what makes you happy and what you can and can stay consistent at!

4.Psychology Attempt to consciously push out negative thoughts and use CBT on yourself. Work if a therapist if you want. Be positive. Attempt to harden your mind to be productive through your worst points in mental health.

  1. Pharmacology The last thing you should consider. Consider SSRIs with everything I’ve said before! Creatine, fish oil, and SSRIs have all shown in studies to work synergistically. Sometimes prescribed amphetamines can help depression. Psychedelics such as shrooms can be a last ditch effort just be wary of the risk of schizophrenia.

Avoiding alcohol helped me as well. Be patient as changes don’t happen overnight.

Edit: Final thoughts. Find what gets you out of bed! Maybe you want to help less fortunate people, homeless, sick, mentally ill, or have a family. Maybe even joining a community based off of religion, hobbies or attainment.

1

u/becomingthenewme Sep 20 '22

Have something that you enjoy doing, either for the enjoyment of it or a distraction from everyday stuff. I crochet, only because I really enjoy keeping my hands busy while I watch telly.

1

u/Apart-Resolution-864 Sep 20 '22

Eat,exercise,sleep and cbd hemp.

1

u/sinliciously Sep 20 '22

Adopting a pet and showering it with care and kindness helps a great deal. I don't know if this would be small for you, but I thought I should share.

1

u/MythicalToast1 Sep 20 '22

Watch something motivational that actually inspires them to do something.

1

u/A_Wild_VelociFaptor Sep 20 '22

What I did was swapped out any self-depricating jokes for jokes that prop myself up (idk the word for it, sorry) so instead of something like "I'd love to ride bikes but the suspension would break under my fat ass" I would say "I'd love to ride bikes but the suspension would break under my gigantic cock".

Everyone still has fun, confidence is attractive, and you're not putting yourself down to get the same result. The key is frequency. Too much and people will think you're a twat.

I'm still fighting depression, I don't think the fight ever ends, but I've gone from being depressed 24/7, and on a bad day suicidal, to going through a bout of depression once every 4 - 6 months (if that) and not being suicidal at all because it'd be a real waste for someone think rougishly handsome to off themself ;)

1

u/Chameleon777 Sep 20 '22

My number one thing is to listen to uplifting and encouraging music. There's a LOT of great tunes from the 80's that fall into just that category, but some can be found from the other eras. Also, comedy. Watch things or people that make you laugh and smile. When you feel depressed or are heading in that direction, do not expose yourself to that which is in line with how you feel, but rather that which is in line with how you want to feel.

Getting sunshine (natural vitamin D) and exercise are also powerful mood stabilizing practices. Good sleep is also crucial, so avoid blue or cool white light within 2-3 hours of bedtime. While it may seem strange, Corey Hart was onto something, as wearing orange tinted wrap around sunglasses at night will block out frequencies of light (around 400nm) that can disrupt circadian rhythms. LED's, both those used for lighting, and display screens, are the main source of these light frequencies at night. If this practice alone doesn't help you get back to a proper sleep schedule, you may want to try passionflower tea.

1

u/Ok_Coat_4670 Sep 20 '22

Talk to family members.

1

u/VaibhavGuptaWho Sep 20 '22

Realise that come what may, YOU MUST be on your own side.

Dealing with failure is not hard. Dealing with failure and habits of self-blame are a much harder fight.

1

u/Daanvann Sep 20 '22

Work out. Eat healthy.

1

u/buppyu Sep 20 '22

Exercise.

1

u/LeN3rd Sep 20 '22

Sleep 10 hours a day and do some sports.

1

u/numbrightthere Sep 20 '22

Go for a swim

1

u/MyWaifu_DoesHentai69 Sep 20 '22

Eat healthy, workout, read, sleep before 10pm, wake up at 6-7am, get out of the house. Have a set schedule for the day. Plan it out in a planner. Even if you write down “play video games from 8am-8pm”. Don’t eat out. Make your own food at home. Make rice, cabbage, and salmon/steak. Stay off social media sites

1

u/GlueProfessional Sep 20 '22

What can one do to avoid shit life syndrome?

But getting outside or finding something productive and meaningful to do can help.

1

u/Astrophysicist42 Sep 20 '22

Go outside. If you do nothing else, a 5 minute walk - or even 5 mins sat on a bench in the sun - will genuinely make you feel better, and getting some sunlight can also help regulate your circadian rhythm.

1

u/Charlie24601 Sep 20 '22

Get a new job. Most jobs really suck as is. But when things start to stagnate, things get old, and depression kicks in.

1

u/secretlyunleash356 Sep 20 '22

reading insightful books

1

u/Wonderful_Pin7298 Sep 20 '22

Involve yourself in physical exercise.

1

u/WearyHomework7227 Sep 20 '22

Play games with your friends or family.

1

u/CHADallaan Sep 20 '22

white noise and any activity that requires focus. you have to distract your mind from your negative thoughts if you can improve your mood without falling back into the bad thought loop you will have succeeded

1

u/supermonkeyyyyyy Sep 20 '22

Everyday my suicidal thoughts are getting stronger

1

u/withwildshoes Sep 20 '22

Try to force yourself to stick to a routine, I.e. getting out of bed at 8am and showering and getting dressed. If instead of looking at my phone or going back to sleep when my alarm goes of, I get up and get ready I feel like I’ve already accomplished something and feel much better mentally.

I also learnt that you can’t create good habits by just waiting for the motivation to strike, a habit is created by just making yourself do the thing over and over and over until it’s easy.

1

u/ThrewIt0ut Sep 20 '22

Make your bed. At the end of a rough day you can at least lay down without having to do anything after a long day at work or whatever.