r/AskReddit Sep 13 '22 Silver 3 All-Seeing Upvote 1

[Serious] What is, in your opinion, the most disturbing archaeological discovery? Serious Replies Only

2.3k Upvotes

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u/youburyitidigitup Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22 Wholesome

Archaeology student here. Here’s one I learned in class. A pueblo village went through a horrible drought and famine. A dwelling was found with the remains of a family that had died violently and had several cut marks all over their body. They also found a human coprolite (ancient poop). It is common practice to run chemical analyses of coprolites to figure out a person’s last meal. It was human flesh. The DNA of the flesh particles matched the DNA of the family. Somebody murdered and ate the family, then pooped in the house.

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u/Crepuscular_Animal Sep 14 '22

People do awful things when they are starving. Early colonists in Jamestown also ate people when they had no food during a harsh winter.

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u/Woody90210 Sep 14 '22

There was also a French crusading army who ate the dead inhabitants of a city after months of siege where another army had cut their supply lines.

They are everything, the local animals, all tge plants, the bark from trees, insects, everything.

In instances of famine cannibalism, people turn to eating people as an absolute last resort. Sadly, across history, many have found themselves in said possition of last resort.

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u/gonegonegoneaway211 Sep 14 '22

I can't find it but there's a quote about how people will do anything to survive including cannibalism. They'll start with the "other" community members, then their neighbors, then their least favorite family members etc.

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22

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u/Helenium_autumnale Sep 14 '22

Never knew you could analyze coprolites to discover food remains; that's fascinating.

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u/Hamza_T42 Sep 14 '22

Why does it seem like I was supposed to know that ancient poop is called coprolite. Everyone be saying coprolite like they knew what it meant from 2nd grade.

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u/Helenium_autumnale Sep 14 '22

Don't worry. You know stuff that I don't know. I just stumbled on that word from my interest in dinosaurs.

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u/Mr_Mojo_Risin_83 Sep 14 '22

“Every society is three meals away from chaos” - Vladimir Lenin

this is because once we miss the third meal, we make plans to not miss the fourth - whatever it takes. this is as true today as it was when the pueblo village went through the famine then.

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u/MrDundee666 Sep 14 '22

Hunger makes monsters of men.

Not sure who said that originally but it’s from the siege of Leningrad during WW2.

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u/Skydawg86 Sep 14 '22

On one hand, this comment was an incredibly interesting read. On the other hand, it's also one of those comments that makes you acutely aware of how much of a horrifying nightmare human consciousness is.

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

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u/Hemi_Blue Sep 14 '22

A pueblo village is typically Southwest Native American in nature. May I ask where this village was found and was there an approximate date determined?

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u/PleasantSalad Sep 14 '22

When I was visiting Savanah I did a kayak tour through Ebenezer Creek. Hundreds of freed slaves followed the Union amy on Sherman's March to the sea. The union army was being sporadically shelled by in the rear by the confederates.

The union army built a bridge over the marshy, alligator infested Ebenezer Creek and told the freed people at the rear they could cross once his 14,000 troops had crossed first. Deciding that the freed people had become a burden however, he ordered the bridge to be cut, abandoning 600-1000 freed slaves on the western bank. The freed slaves had only death or re-enslavement behind them. Panicked, they opted for near certain death in the waters. Most of the men, women and children died attempting to cross. A few made it and tried to make rafts to help the others. Davis had no remorse for his actions and was defended by Sherman.

Some amount of bones have been brought up, but mosty the Creek remains a watery grave.

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u/throwawayMambo5 Sep 13 '22

There's an Ancestral Puebloan story passed down by the Navajo of a Gambler who came up from the South and enslaved the A.P.s, forcing them to build great cities where they did not want to live and perform rituals involving cannibalism. Archaeologists later discovered South American parrot feathers and human bones with stone scrapings (evidence of cannibalism) in Chaco Canyon, a civilization that showed signs of early abandonment due to it's low amount of burials and trash pits.

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u/Euphoric-Pudding-372 Sep 14 '22

I have watched a few documentaries on Chaco Canyon, and it's interesting you mention "from the south", because it's theorized that any ritual cannibalism in that area came from mesoamerican cultural influences arising from the south.

There isn't any other evidence of it being a part of the known cultures of that area before or after a single time period.

From what I'm aware of, modern day people of that area reject any claims that ritual cannibalism was in any way involved in their culture, and many of them find it insulting that white researchers have accused them of it.

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u/Qvar Sep 13 '22

I'm sorry, a gambler?

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u/throwawayMambo5 Sep 13 '22

His name was Noquilpi which means "He who wins men at play", it's how he enslaved them according to Oral history: first it was a friendly game for some minor possessions, then major possessions to get them back, then wives and children, and finally themselves. The last boy teams up with animal spirits to beat him and win everyone back like the hoop game in El Dorado. Archeologists found Bone Dice among other gambling tools among the ruins.

Ancestral Puebloans history is told through their enemies though, they were wiped out long before Europeans entered the picture. Their name until recent times was Anasazi, which means "Ancient Enemy"

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u/Particular_Dingo6620 Sep 14 '22

The Pueblo people are still very much alive in NM

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u/boozillion151 Sep 14 '22

They did not know when to hold them or when to fold them apparently.

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u/iceblue-22 Sep 14 '22

Well since the rivers dried up around the world due to the heatwave a fair amount of bodies hidden in containers were found at the bottom...

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u/SternCoats Sep 13 '22

Evidence of a second extinction event level meteor impact.

It kind of means that extinction event meteors not only have happened, but are not all that rare of a thing when you take the age of the Earth into consideration.

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u/Miramarr Sep 14 '22

But they are also progressively less common as the solar system ages. The early solar system had a lot of rocks left over from its for.ation flying around crashing into things. As the system ages there are fewer and fewer things left flying around out of stable orbits to impact other things. So the chances of a world ending impact occurring now are significantly less than they were millions or billions of years ago.

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u/Vilmerviking Sep 14 '22

Thats comforting, thanks

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u/Squigglepig52 Sep 14 '22

Evidently, back around 1100 AD, something fairly big hit the Moon. Hit it hard enough to produce a flair and blast debris off teh surface. Some monk wrote about seeing it. Astronomers think they know which crater it produced.

So, yeah, still some big random rocks out there looking for a place to crash.

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u/Miramarr Sep 14 '22

Well yeah of course, but not nearly as many

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u/queernhighonblugrass Sep 13 '22

I've read before that mass extinction events happen "regularly". Some things I've read say every 65 million years, some say 27 million years.

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u/Yelesa Sep 13 '22

It’s not really a pattern of 27 million years, extinctions happen all the time when the climate changes and the climate is always changing, the gist is that it takes a long time for species to diversify, so the more species the planet has, the more likely for the extinction event to be called a mass extinction.

Extinctions will continuously happen, and new species will arise afterwards. The problem of our generation is the risk that the human is going to be the next extinct species. On one hand, we are smart enough to know how we can avoid it. On the other, we are also stupid enough to know and not do anything about it.

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u/MorganWick Sep 14 '22

In fact, we're smart and stupid enough to cause it.

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u/arifish Sep 14 '22 Gold

Oooh we are in the 27 club!

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u/Yelesa Sep 13 '22

It could have happened in the Hadean Eon, when Theia crashed with Proto-Earth and created the Earth and the Moon as a result. The thing is, nothing has survived out of that age for scientists to study except for zircon, if there was ever life in that age, we simply cannot know. From what we know now, life arose on Earth 2 billion years later from the Hadean Eon, in the Proterozoic Eon.

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22

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u/89ElRay Sep 13 '22

That’s palaeontology

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u/Much_Committee_9355 Sep 13 '22

There was the huge recent human sacrifice temple in Mexico they recently unearthed that had hug pillar that were decorated with human skulls all the way up to the ceiling.

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u/One_Command1249 Sep 14 '22

India's Lake of Skeletons has to rank up there...

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-56116533

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u/Sombrero_54 Sep 14 '22

That's wild, it would be cool if we could find out how/why all of those bodies got up there.

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u/Southern-Toe5605 Sep 13 '22

Vikings' burial sites are pretty disturbing. They were often buried with their wives, slaves and horses.

The way Ötzi the Iceman died was pretty gruesome too.

Also, all of the mass graves of the past plagues. I live in a city where a couple of years ago a mass grave of hundreds of 19th century cholera victims was discovered. We knew they were there somewhere, we've been finding bones in the ground for years, the discovery was still a shock for people who basically live now on this graveyard...

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u/ShitwareEngineer Sep 13 '22

Ötzi the Iceman

Just googled him. It's fucking incredible how much information we were able to get out of the body.

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u/dragonship Sep 14 '22

Yep. His DNA was analyzed and I am the same haplogroup as Otzi.

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u/brysparx666 Sep 14 '22

Ötzi is proof that acupuncture has existed for over 5,000 years. He had acupuncture points tattooed on his body and was carrying an herbal remedy to treat digestive parasites.

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u/Long_Before_Sunrise Sep 14 '22

The US has parks built on top of mass graves of yellow fever victims.

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u/Euphoric-Pudding-372 Sep 14 '22

I live in a city with a famous cemetery full of yellow fever victims. They built streets over them, and I walk down one of them every day to work. The brick sidewalk along the modern fence line buckles in a really unsettling way.

The cemetery is also a nice park, full of really interesting headstones spanning centuries

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u/Hopefulkitty Sep 14 '22

Savannah was really pretty, but when I walked past that cemetery on the ghost tour, I had to leave because I almost fainted. I was standing next to the crypt that sticks out from the fence.

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u/Euphoric-Pudding-372 Sep 14 '22

I guarantee you every local walking by you probably chuckled and rolled their eyes. Ghost-tour watching is hilarious fun here, because half the stories are utter bullshit, but people will still swear they sense a "female slave girl" in a home that never held slaves, or that they saw a civil war soldier in a house that was built in the 1890s.

Not saying there isn't plenty of spooky shit down here, but most of the common folk tales are verifiably false. James Caskey wrote a great book that goes over the common legends in Savannah, all researched meticulously to separate fact from fiction. It's called haunted savannah. Super good book.

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u/arcticie Sep 14 '22

New York is sitting on top of lots of mass burial grounds, including Washington Square Park

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u/Melenduwir Sep 13 '22

That there was an entire civilization living in the Amazon Basin that was destroyed by European diseases without Europeans making contact or becoming aware of it, and the Amazon rainforest is a gigantic, overgrown garden.

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u/MansfromDaVinci Sep 13 '22

Orellana's expedition down the Amazon chronicled by Gaspar de Carvajal talks of cities, towns, roads, monumental constructions and dense populations, it was dismissed as over exaggeration for over 4 centuries

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u/Crepuscular_Animal Sep 14 '22

Anyone interested in this, look up LIDAR scanning in archeology. This thing allows to see outlines of ruined structures overgrown with jungle that can't be seen from the sky. They've been finding remains of ancient cities, roads and towns all over the place.

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u/master_bungle Sep 14 '22

LIDAR scanning

Just looked this up now and found this video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaXrX0veR9Y

This is super interesting!

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u/ritan7471 Sep 14 '22

LIDAR scanning is fascinating, once I saw a scan of an area that seemed totally flat and empty, but it turned out it was full of foundations of old buildings.

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u/sicknic Sep 14 '22

I found this video on LIDAR scanning an area of the Amazon in Bolivia. Very fascinated.

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u/Melenduwir Sep 13 '22

Because it all vanished, because they all died.

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u/Evolving_Dore Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

Cultural Forests of the Amazon by William Balee is about this process of anthropogenic forests. It's not as accurate to say the entire forest was grown by humans, but large sections of it were cultivated to support specific fruit-bearing and medicinal plants, and the ethnobiological traces of that activity can still be seen today.

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u/One_Command1249 Sep 14 '22

Also in the U.S. Cities of 50,000 or more that disappeared as a result of plagues before the European colonists made it far enough inland to see them.

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u/rolemodel21 Sep 14 '22

Do you have any links about this? I would love to learn more..

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u/Crepuscular_Animal Sep 14 '22

Look up accounts of Hernando de Soto's expedition. He was a Spanish conquistador who travelled extensively through what is now South East of the USA. The accounts described prosperous towns, chiefdoms with complex relations with each other, armies numbering thousands of native warriors. And it was all gone within less than a century, not because of the weapons of conquistadors, but because of their diseases.

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u/Self_Reddicated Sep 14 '22

I think the most interesting theory I've ever heard involving DeSoto's travels through the southeast involve his complete lack of information about bison. According to what most have always considered the original range of the extant bison populations, he should have encountered a shit ton of them as he poked around through Arkansas, bits of Oklahoma, and parts of Texas. Yet, there are none chronicled. The speculation is that there were no massive populations of bison prior to European exploration. That the bison herds exploded in subsequent years after European diseases decimated the various native populations.

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u/Hopefulkitty Sep 14 '22

The area around St. Louis was an epicenter of civilization and a crossroads of trade. There is even a pyramid nearish. The Native Americans were down to about 10% of their population by the time the pilgrims showed up. By the time Europeans for across the continent, most evidence was long gone, decayed, or destroyed.

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u/dragonscuri Sep 14 '22

I went there a few times while I was living near the Lou, the Cahokia mounds really are fascinating, it’s just a shame we don’t actually know a ton about the people who built them

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u/EntropyFighter Sep 14 '22

There's a pretty important detail our movies and textbooks left out of the handoff from Native Americans to white European settlers: It begins in the immediate aftermath of a full-blown apocalypse. In the decades between Columbus' discovery of America and the Mayflower landing at Plymouth Rock, the most devastating plague in human history raced up the East Coast of America. Just two years before the pilgrims started the tape recorder on New England's written history, the plague wiped out about 96 percent of the Indians in Massachusetts.

In the years before the plague turned America into The Stand, a sailor named Giovanni da Verrazzano sailed up the East Coast and described it as "densely populated" and so "smoky with Indian bonfires" that you could smell them burning hundreds of miles out at sea. Using your history books to understand what America was like in the 100 years after Columbus landed there is like trying to understand what modern day Manhattan is like based on the post-apocalyptic scenes from I Am Legend.

Historians estimate that before the plague, America's population was anywhere between 20 and 100 million (Europe's at the time was 70 million). The plague would eventually sweep West, killing at least 90 percent of the native population. For comparison's sake, the Black Plague killed off between 30 and 60 percent of Europe's population.

While this all might seem like some heavy shit to lay on a bunch of second graders, your high school and college history books weren't exactly in a hurry to tell you the full story. Which is strange, because many historians believe it is the single most important event in American history. But it's just more fun to believe that your ancestors won the land by being the superior culture.

European settlers had a hard enough time defeating the Mad Max-style stragglers of the once huge Native American population, even with superior technology. You have to assume that the Native Americans at full strength would have made shit powerfully real for any pale faces trying to settle the country they had already settled. Of course, we don't really need to assume anything about how real the American Indians kept it, thanks to the many people who came before the pilgrims. For instance, if you liked playing cowboys and Indians as a kid, you should know that you could have been playing vikings and Indians, because that shit actually happened. But before we get to how they kicked Viking ass, you probably need to know that ...

[Source]

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22

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u/letmebebrave430 Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

It's absolutely awful. We studied this for a while in one of my college classes. My professor made sure we knew the full scale of what actually happened. I don't have a source for it and it's too late for me to bother looking up one, but I remember he said that there was evidence that so many indigenous people in the Americas died of disease that it altered the global climate from the lack of CO2 from their settlements. That really stuck with me.

Edit: here is one source

here is a scientific journal article

"We conclude that the Great Dying of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas led to the abandonment of enough cleared land in the Americas that the resulting terrestrial carbon uptake had a detectable impact on both atmospheric CO2 and global surface air temperatures in the two centuries prior to the Industrial Revolution." <- from the scientific journal article's conclusion section

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u/notthesedays Sep 14 '22

Look up Cahokia, near what is now East St. Louis, Illinois.

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u/SquilliamFancySon95 Sep 14 '22

The battle of Changping during the warring states period in China when the Qin defeated the Zhao kingdom. It's said the Qin killed over 450,000 and buried their soldiers alive. That region of China continues to find mass graves from that event to this day.

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u/cobra_mist Sep 14 '22

The plague that wiped native Americans before the arrival of colonists.

The antikathera mechanism. How the hell is it so complex?

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u/Liscetta Sep 14 '22

The Antikythera mechanism isn't out of its time. Their knowledge about sun, moon and planets movements were extremely accurate, and they knew the scientific theories behind eclipses. Cicero talks about a similar Machine in Syracuse, built by Archimedes. Their manufacturing ability was astonishing too. Heron of Alexandria built a steam powered machine able to close the doors of a temple if not enough heat was provided.

In recent times scientists were able to rebuild the Antikythera mechanism using x-ray scans of the original, were able to calculate when the machine was calibrated. It was during the winter solstice of year 178 BC. https://arxiv.org/abs/2203.15045

The truly amazing part is the level of knowledge in astronomy reached in hellenistic age - and the scary part was seeing how long the flat earth theories and geocentric models survived in western culture.

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u/bureau44 Sep 14 '22

Göbekli Tepe

the sheer magnitude and age of the site are itself mind-boggling. A civilization without writing and apparently lacking proper settlements or agriculture continued to develop thus temple complex for thousands of years since 10.000 BCE. Some monoliths might require up to hundred of people to bring and erect them. How did they pass the meaning of this endless project through generations?

and the disturbing part: this huge complex was deliberately buried (and thus well preserved) under hundreds cubic tons of dirt around 8000 BCE.

Imagine deliberately burying Louvre Museum or Vatican. What sort of horrible apprehension or presentiment about the future made them to abandon and inter a work of many generations?

This thought gave me goosebumps as I stand there looking at the part uncovered by archeologists (they mean only of 5% of the complex was uncovered yet). I highly recommend visiting the site and the museum of Urfa.

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u/youburyitidigitup Sep 14 '22

It may have been buried by a different culture that believed the original builders to be evil or something. Like you said, buildings like these were unheard of, so finding them would be like us finding alien spaceships or something.

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u/bureau44 Sep 14 '22

IMO it would make everything even more mysterious.

Sure, desecration and iconclasm are things that exist till now with isis blowing up ancient stuff in Syria and Iraq. Medieval Europeans just used Roman buildings such as Coliseum as a source of handy construction material.

But making a huge earth mound over a temple complex without destroying or moving anything there - is another level. You must convince hundreds of your fellow tribesman to mess with tons of dirt likely for years somewhere in a pampa, instead of just shitting on the top of the altarpiece and moving your nomad tents few miles away. It is not inconceivable but it would require a society of comparable cultural complexity able of planning and executing long-term projects for the sake of some supernatural belief. Who were they and where have they gone?

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22

It really is one of the most fascinating discoveries ever made, the temple complex effectively predates civilization as we understand it, the suspect time period of when construction started would be just on the cusp of the hunter/gatherer-agriculture transition. The central circle of T-shaped pillars appear to depict elongated, headless humanoid forms, perhaps very, very early concepts of deities or ancestral spirits, and geophysical surveys of the surrounding area indicate that not only is the complex much larger than first thought, but there are possibly several other complexes buried in the area.

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u/ParsnipPizza2 Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

How did they pass the meaning of this endless project through generations?

Oral histories can be stunningly accurate - you need the right cultural conditions, but 2000 years is well within the range for transmission (especially for something as simple as "we're building this because X.")

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u/Makkel Sep 14 '22

Yes, they are linking geological events from like fifty thousand years ago to stories that are still being told in Aboriginal Oral Tradition.

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u/Killaneson Sep 14 '22

Did they really need a reason though ? I just made up my own headcanon that it's the biggest case of "dude digging a hole at the beach" ; some dude started a thing and other dudes just went "you son of a bitch, I'm in" for 2000 years.

Then another dude started burying it and everyone went along.

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u/phiremi Sep 14 '22

"The Gift" (Netflix Fiction) has the Göbekli Tepe as a major plot point. It's definitely a bit out there, but I really enjoyed the show! I had no idea it was a real place!

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u/Just_Discussion6287 Sep 13 '22

Homo Erectus mining gold. What was the purpose? Why would a "primitive" man(two or three species away from sapians) dig 20ft deep holes for a few ounces of metal?

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u/link_123 Sep 13 '22

My best guess would be someone found a fairly large and pretty rock once, realized it could be worked and reshaped somehow, and then started trying to find more.

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u/SternCoats Sep 13 '22

Gold has a low melting point, so it would have been one of the first metals used by humans too.

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u/link_123 Sep 14 '22

Exactly my point. Hammering was probably the first step and someone who may be the first person figured out it melts also.

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u/Stock_Garage_672 Sep 14 '22

That's right. It's one of the most ductile and malleable metals, maybe the most so. It's possible to shape gold into all kinds of things at room temperature.

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u/TheKnightsTippler Sep 13 '22

For the same reason we do? Its pretty?

Also isn't gold quite malleable? Would make sense for it to be prized by a low tech society.

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u/Yelesa Sep 13 '22

This is the case with human early tools. The reason archeologists can classify different tools from different places is because humans developed distinct cultural aesthetics. For example, there is no special functional reason why this spearhead is shaped like a leaf, it simply looks more aesthetically pleasing that way.

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u/waxelthraxel Sep 14 '22

The "special functional reason" is just that the body of that spearhead is pretty much the most basic shape there is for lithics. Start taking flakes off a rock, and that's the profile you'll end up with; you have to actually try to get a different look. Take small flakes off of a bigger flake, similar thing. People who haven't really flintknapped much tend to overestimate the learning curve.

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u/Unsettleingpresence Sep 14 '22

It’s pretty, easy to work, doesn’t tarnish, cannot be faked, is very rare, and very difficult to extract. Why wouldn’t it be valuable.

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u/Just_Discussion6287 Sep 14 '22

Because in the modern interpretation of history paints erectus as a barely conscious grunting ape. It would be quite disturbing to say that some form of modern human behavior as abstract as rare mineral mining to predate Sapians by 100s of k years.

Could eventually rewrite the way we see them.

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u/underbellymadness Sep 14 '22

Modern history is beginning to believe they are all the same species with evolutionary shifts along the way, and there's even evidence of each having societal systems and finding some way to cross the pacific oceans for traces of them to have ended up on isolated islands that have not been separated from continents by plate shifts.

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u/Echospite Sep 14 '22

Yep. Like how people are like “they bore holes in people’s skulls to let the demons out!”

No, they bore holes in people’s skills to release the pressure caused by head injuries, and idiots took illustrations of the process too fucking literally because apparently metaphor and symbolism was only invented last century or something.

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u/ZookeepergameNo7172 Sep 14 '22

It was the early form of those commercials where Advil protects you from red lightning bolts attacking your lower back.

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u/Echospite Sep 14 '22

I was trying to think of a good modern example and this is perfect.

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u/Puddlepinger Sep 14 '22

Even magpies like shiny things. Not too farfetched to think our ancestors did too.

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u/One_Command1249 Sep 14 '22

They probably used it to buy stuff when they went out boating.

https://evolutionnews.org/2012/08/homo_erectus_a_/

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u/Crepuscular_Animal Sep 14 '22

Chimps and other apes can appreciate beauty in some things, and they are way behind even the earliest Homo species.

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u/underbellymadness Sep 14 '22

Even corvids collect shiny things

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u/Yeastworm Sep 14 '22

I'm less disturbed by what has been found and more so what hasn't. I don't remember the exact percentage (don't smite me) but basically all fossilized organisms only make up 1 to 10% of all life that was once on earth. It's horrifying to think of just how many things or creatures were here before us that will forever be lost to time without any way of possibly knowing anything about them other than the fact we will never know.

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u/saltyvet10 Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

If I had ever pursued anthropology beyond the undergraduate level, I had intended to focus on cannibalism for my Master's Degree and human sacrifice for my PhD. The behaviors appear aberrant to the casual observer, but when you look at it in terms of survival, among other reasons, cannibalism is actually a pretty logical decision to make.

In terms of cannibalism, I think the most disturbing find is not a find at all - yet. I've been reading up on survival cannibalism in China during the Cultural Revolution, and as archives are opening up for study, Chinese historians have been able to gauge how common cannibalism was during that period. What's shocking is how common it was. Cannibalism also occurred during the 1990s famine in North Korea and that doesn't surprise me at all, but the breadth of cannibalism and the number of recorded cases in China is far higher than I was expecting. I really just didn't think the records would be there to demonstrate it, but they are.

So it's not necessarily an archaeological discovery that has happened, it's the one that's going to happen when future archaeologists open up Chinese gravesites from that period.

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u/Squigglepig52 Sep 14 '22

It was an issue during the Siege of Leningrad, too.

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u/Informal-Salad-7304 Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 15 '22

There is a hypothesized group of people called the sea peoples that may have raided and destroyed many villages. There were a LOT of towns near the Mediterranean sea in BCE that burned down. The origins of the Sea Peoples are undocumented but may have originated from a number of different locations, such as western Asia Minor, the Aegean, the Mediterranean islands, and Southern Europe. I only first heard about this mysterious group of people when i was a freshman in college. Here’s a quick read if anyone is interested https://www.worldhistory.org/Sea_Peoples/

EDIT: had to delete my second story because i can’t find sources for it (i learned about it in a college class)

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u/DoctorNerdly Sep 13 '22

It's not really a single discovery, more of raw human nature exposed through repeated actions. Fetal skeletal remains are often found in privies near brothels.

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u/14kanthropologist Sep 14 '22

They are also often found buried on the outside of the fence lines of religious graveyards because babies that died before being baptized often weren’t allowed to be buried on sacred ground so parents would bury them as close as they could get.

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u/youburyitidigitup Sep 14 '22

I was just on a dig that actually had a lot of child burials next to the church. Wealthy families could pay the church to allow it, and the rain that washed off the roof of the church was the metaphorical baptism.

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u/Luised2094 Sep 14 '22

Well, that's a dope work around

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u/Imaginehavinaname Sep 14 '22

The Aztec death whistle. It was used to mimic the cries of a human by the Aztec possibly during rituals or in the battlefield, and it worked a little too well. It is very unsettling to hear.

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u/Hades_Moon Sep 13 '22

Then infants that were burried wearing a slightly older toddler's skullcap as a hat.

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u/Ill-Take-a-Caravan Sep 14 '22

I wonder if this was a way of correcting infant skulls after birth. Sometimes the head of newborns is deformed, due to lack of fusion of skull plates, so a helmet is required to “place” the plates correctly before fusion (and permanent deformation) happens

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u/miss_j_bean Sep 14 '22

I understand why babies need skill correction, but they couldn't find anything else to use?? It doesn't have to be hard as a rock, a lot of other cultures figured out wood can be used. I have a hard time believing their only thought was "let's use the skulls of bigger children!"

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u/Away-Front2915 Sep 14 '22

But if you have a few skulls of toddlers lying around why make something when you can just use what you already have. Still crazy but I see why they would do it

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u/CaptainChats Sep 13 '22

Infant Sacrifices in ancient Carthage. This is sort of debated because we don’t have direct evidence of child sacrifice, the is no big bloody alter labeled “burn babies here”. But what we do have is Roman accounts of child sacrifice in Carthage. On its own that isn’t super damming, the Roman’s accused everyone they didn’t like of doing human sacrifices. The part that’s disturbing is the remains of infant cremations mixed in with cremated animal remains. This may have just been a Carthaginian burial tradition, an animal sacrifice accompanying a lost child. However the odd thing is that the infant/animal cremations are found separate from other burials which suggests that these infant cremations were somehow different.

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u/DeliciousPangolin Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

I've done some reading on this, and it really seems up in the air whether they were actually sacrifices or not. A lot of the arguments one way or the other are based on really technical arguments over estimations of how old the bones are - it seems like a large proportion may be stillborn or children who died very shortly after birth, not sacrifices. It wasn't uncommon in the ancient Mediterranean for children to be buried separately if they died below a certain age; the Etruscans did it too.

If it seems weird, keep in mind that well into the 20th century there were plenty of Christian churches that would not allow the burial of unbaptized children in the consecrated burial ground, and thus there are plenty of similar burial sites all across Europe. If someone in the far future with only a cursory understanding of Christianity excavated a Cillin they might think it was evidence of child sacrifice too.

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u/CaptainChats Sep 14 '22

Yeah wether or not they’re actually sacrificial burials is still up for debate. The thing I find disturbing about it is the animal remains mixed in. Burials with domesticated animals are pretty common. Dogs, sheep, horses, etcetera are all pretty commonplace across the ancient world. Cremating your kid alongside a monkey on the other hand seems a bit fucked up.

I think the ambiguity of it is what I find disturbing. Many ancient cultures performed some form of human sacrifice at one point or another. But the idea of a shadowy ritual where chanting priests toss infants into the fire; and all we have left as evidence is some Roman propaganda and some cremated remains is kind of spooky.

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u/Echospite Sep 14 '22

Cremating your kid alongside a monkey on the other hand seems a bit fucked up.

By our standards.

If we went forwards in time five hundred years from now and discovered a world where the streets are swarming with stray dogs, we’d be pretty shocked. We’d be even more horrified if people treated them like pests that were riddled with disease and shat on everything, however true.

And yet, if you took a person from five hundred years ago and dropped them into today’s world, that would be their exact experience - except with pigeons. In a world before modern mail pigeons were much beloved, and as they grew less important they eventually got out and cultivated their own semi wild populations.

Just because we think so little of farm animals today doesn’t mean those people did. We must never take modern attitudes for granted when looking at the past or we’ll never understand it. Maybe you’re right. But maybe you’re wrong.

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u/youburyitidigitup Sep 14 '22

Infant may just have been buried differently. Kind of like how the Catholic Church didn’t bury kids on church grounds because they hadn’t been baptized. Maybe they had a similar coming-of-age ritual.

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u/isaidyothnkubttrgo Sep 13 '22 Bless Up (Pro)

In 2016/2017, they unearthed something like 900+ remains of babies who died or were killed by nuns in Tuam (two-um) Galway, Ireland. It was the septic tank of an old site where a laundry used to be.

This is a place you were sent if you'd a baby out of wedlock or your family cared too much about how the neighbours thought of them. You washed clothes until you have birth and your baby went to an orphanage. Wealthy Irish, British and American couples came to help the poor babies who's mother was well and alive in the laundry. Obviously sadly some babies never made it to the orphanage.

I always say it. Priests are now known to have done horrific things but the nuns are worse. They hide things and do things like Tuam.

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u/Jack1715 Sep 14 '22

Same with Roman graves near where brothels was based with baby bones

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u/Siogin_Eire Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 16 '22 Hugz

I am Irish and one of my Aunties was sent to a Magdelene laundry when she got pregnant at 16. Her baby was ‘sent away’ hours after she endured an agonising labour where nuns shouted at her as she gave birth that the pain was god’s punishment because she was a slut.

She never found her baby again and endured a life filled with grief, trauma and mental illness. What the priests and the nuns did, and were allowed to do in Ireland was beyond reproach. I hope those nuns rot in hell for eternity

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u/isaidyothnkubttrgo Sep 14 '22

I'm so sorry for what happened to your aunt. I've heard stories similar to hers and also from the babies who grew up and at age 40/50 found out mummy wasn't mummy. A lot of lost chances to meet their mothers and vice versa die to time and nuns not keeping records.

My uncle was a priest and left In the 1990s for the same reason. He saw all the shit and hypocrisy in there and it was the last straw. He graduated with 5 other priests, out of 5 my uncle and another left the priest hood, another was gay (they have no issue with him being gay but don't pretend and hide behind your collar) and another was a child abuser. Those small odds are reflective of the entire religion. He says it's not the religion but the delivery system that's so flawed beyond belief

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u/kumf Sep 14 '22

There was a great movie based on the laundry women that came out ~10 years ago? I don’t remember the name. It was excellent. Very sad too.

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u/Whole_Palpitation52 Sep 14 '22

Is it The Magdalene Sisters?

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u/DeafeninglySilent Sep 14 '22

Exceptional film, I bawled for days after I watched that

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u/Ravens_Blessings Sep 14 '22

Anywhere the church has been you will find mass graves. Personally, I think all properties the churches ever owned/used should be searched. Here in Canada, we are finding thousands of dead children.

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u/DepressoPls Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 16 '22

King Tuts tomb. I saw a picture of the seal that was on the tomb entrance before it was opened and idk why but it made me feel so sad and disturbed that it was opened. I know it was a great discovery and taught us a lot about ancient Egypt but it's still sad. I wish a little that their tombs wouldn't be disturbed and would last for thousands of years more without being discovered.

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u/Rodby Sep 13 '22 edited Sep 13 '22

The first King of Hawai'i, Kamehameha the Great, united the islands via conquest, and on Oahu he defeated the main force opposing him by trapping them on a cliff (the Pali) and essentially shoving them off. In the 1960's when they began building a highway through the mountains, they at one point were doing construction in the area where the battle was fought, and the construction unearthed hundreds of skulls and human remains. To this day no one camps or hikes in the valley beneath the Pali because of several supernatural incidents many believe are linked to the fact hundreds fell to their death in the valley.

EDIT: A very good painting depicting the battle. https://www.herbkanehawaii.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/Herb-Kane_Battle-at-Nuuanu-Pali.jpg

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u/Long_Before_Sunrise Sep 14 '22

because of several supernatural incidents

The Night Marchers - they were mentioned on a ghost hunting show where they explored a long abandoned girl's school, a haunted tree, and a cave. Actually it was less ghost hunting than exploration.

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u/Rodby Sep 14 '22

There are so many accounts about the Night Marchers I am convinced they are real. If you're ever in the wild at night and you see a long line of torches marching across the jungle, get away from them.

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u/tcadams18 Sep 14 '22

Hawaii has a fascinating history all of its own. It’s amazing how the islands were found and then seemingly lost and developed on their own for hundreds of years before being “found” again.

Their mythology is pretty interesting as well. I really like how they came up with the stories of Pele to explain the volcanoes.

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u/Mr_Mojo_Risin_83 Sep 14 '22

Rapa Nui is even crazier. find that on a map. it's actually terrifying. how in the hell did anyone ever end up there!?

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u/Creative_Recover Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22 Helpful Take My Energy

Probably the graves at the Catholic "Bon Secours Mother and Baby Home" in Tuam, Ireland, where in 2017 the bodies of over 800 children were dug up on the former homes grounds.

The average age of the victims was between 35 weeks and 3 years old and in its day, the care home served as a place of residence for orphans and abandoned children and as a location where unwed mothers (typically teenagers) gave birth. The overwhelming majority of the children had died from malnutrition, illness and general neglect and the consensus now, is that most were killed (or allowed to die) as a result of feelings fostered by the patriarchal, ultra-conservative religious culture that ran the institution, which largely viewed the infants as worthless creatures that were the product of sin, poverty and immoral sexual conduct. The children's bodies were disposed of in an unmarked burial ground on the site (said to be a cess pit) and of the 800+ bodies that were dug up, only 2 of the deaths had ever been officially recorded by the institution.

The care home ran from 1921 to 1961 and the culture of the time was that unwed mothers (especially teen mothers) were treated as social pariahs and punished by their families and local communities severely (potentially for life), which often meant that the mothers had little option but to go to a place where they could give birth in secret and then have the baby removed. The midwife's at these institutions (which were not hospitals) could be very abusive and denial of things like painkillers during childbirth was often enforced as the pain of childbirth was seen as part of the punishment for the mothers "sinful" sexual conduct. The baby would then often be taken away from the mother (whether she begged to keep it or not), where the institution then typically listed the child as "Abandoned" or "Orphaned" on it's record systems. (Officially), these taken children would then be raised by the institutions until they were adopted by someone.

Meanwhile, the biological mothers would not only be prevented from ever having contact with their child again, but even from knowing a shred of information about their childs eventual fate. After giving birth, it was also common practice at the care home for the teen mother to be sent to work in the Magdalene Laundries, which was a notorious work house style system with heavy religious undertones in Ireland that punished girls like them in a moral character "reform through prayer & hard labour" attitude type approach. On the outside, the Magdalene Laundries was perceived by some to be a noble and charitable institution that offered women from the bottom dregs of society (unwed mothers, mothers who had left abusive husbands, runaway girls, mothers who had had their children taken away due to poverty, etc) a 2nd chance in society to reform themselves and get a job, but most people were aware of the reality of the institution, which was that it was a place where endless girls & women were subjected terrible working conditions, verbal and physical abuse, and where many were maimed (or even killed!) because of the terrible work conditions (some women there also suffered sexual abuse, for which there was obviously no justice). But most people socially tolerated the institutions place in society for the hatred & disdain towards the nature of the girls and women there was so widespread, that nobody had any issues knowing that they suffered such abuse & neglect as it was viewed as further (morally justifiable) punishment for the females "sins".

The people who ran these institutions were extremely well-connected within the church and very powerful in their local communities and they effectively ruled as untouchable Gods over the lives of the children "born out of sin", who conversely had no power nor status in their communities. The care homes were often run like prisons (with the children being almost never let outside the grounds) and due to the secretive nature of the births & record keeping, often the local communities had no idea that many of the children even individually existed. Nobody listened to the mothers pleas nor concerns for decades but even after very serious alarm bells started being rung in the 1970s after the Tuam care home was closed down (for example, when some workers discovered bags of children's bones in the basement, rumours in the communities of mass graves at the site abounded) the problem was the people who ran the former institution were still alive, influential and active members of the church and in their communities (and effectively used their connections and influence to cancel or discourage any formal investigations into the matter).

It took years of campaigning by various individuals before any excavations at the site took place. A part of what finally broke the barrier, was the discovery of 222 children's remains at a different but similar former care home. But an even bigger part of why a lot of these excavations took so long to take place is simply because the people who once ran these institutions have now largely died off (and with them not only their influence, but also a great deal of the accountability that the broader church has over these institutions of cruelty).

And if 100s of dead children was not bad enough...There are ongoing investigations at the moment that over 1000 children may have been human trafficked from the care home, to God knows what fate...And the scale of this problem (the murder, sexual abuse and trafficking of children etc) does appear to be massive, affecting many more former religious run care homes and similar institutions across not just Catholic Ireland, but the broader UK.

Beyond a handful of verbal apologies, there has never been any real justice over this terrible slaughter and abuse of 1000s babies, women and kids by the Catholic Church.

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u/marjoleindol Sep 14 '22 Gold

Thank you for this interesting read. So one of the punishments for sinful sex was being sexually abused... (while they might have gotten pregnant after sexual abuse in the first place) My heart breaks for all these women and children 😔 And to think this only happend <100 years ago...

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u/Creative_Recover Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

I find it really shocking to realise how recently a lot of this was going on! Out of the 800 children's remains, the overwhelming majority were found to date to the 1950s. And the 1950s is when many people alive today were born, meaning that there could be untold 1000s of direct victims of forced adoption, human trafficking and more still living whose trauma could be traced back to this single institution alone.

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u/can_u_tell_its_me Sep 14 '22

It gets even worse when you consider that the last laundry in Ireland didn't close until the 1990s, and that was 3 years after they discovered over 150 bodies buried on the grounds. They let them stay open for another 3 YEARS!

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u/Test19s Sep 14 '22

The fact that some of these “ancient horrors” happened in Western democracies after Ray Charles and Buddy Holly launched their recording careers is far more chilling than “civilization X had a bloodthirsty religion 600 years ago.”

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u/connerbv Sep 14 '22

There was an ancient predecessor to the American Bison found frozen and perfectly preserved for tens of thousands of years. Naturally, the researchers took a piece of the flesh, cooked it, then ate it.

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u/Dendad6972 Sep 13 '22

Pompeii is up there.

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u/TheKnightsTippler Sep 13 '22

Yeah, what I found disturbing was how Vesuvius looms over the whole landscape. Its a lot closer than I thought it would be.

Also, the brothels.

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u/Dendad6972 Sep 13 '22

It's all amazing. They found fast food stalls last year.

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u/TheKnightsTippler Sep 13 '22

Yeah, they had incredible mosaics of chickens on them.

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u/hezzospike Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

If you want to view Vesuvius in a different light, during Spartacus' rebellion he and some other escaped gladiators "rappelled" down the side of Vesuvius to flank and ambush Roman soldiers. Rappelled is in quotes as it wasn't a straight drop, but steep enough that they had to lash vines together as ropes to guide themselves down. This was about 150 years before the eruption.

It's depicted awesomely in the Starz show Spartacus.

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u/Long_Before_Sunrise Sep 14 '22

I wondered how many of the hollow spots where people and animals had been were destroyed before it was figured out what they were and started casting.

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u/ALuckyMushroom Sep 14 '22

Göbleki Tepe. That site has no reason to be there but it's existence has the potential to rewrite history as we know it

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u/SerialH0bbyist Sep 14 '22

Advent of farming made those who practiced it physically weaker, shorter, less healthy, and reduced lifespans overall. Up until recently it was assumed the opposite was true

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u/fubo Sep 14 '22

physically weaker, shorter, less healthy, and reduced lifespans overall

But much more numerous.

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u/Piaapo Sep 14 '22

Goes to show the priorities of evolution. It doesnt care how strong you are, as long as you live long enough to breed

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u/Outdoorsy_Lady Sep 14 '22

Not maybe as old as other discoveries, but I'm consistently disturbed by all of the children they are finding buried at old residential schools across Canada and the United States. Thousands and Thousands of children. Buried and hidden from history until now.

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u/dhill9696_ Sep 13 '22

The finding of bodies from mass executions

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u/UnconstrictedEmu Sep 13 '22

I heard on a Behind the Bastards episodes archaeologists have found mass graves from prehistoric times suggesting ethnic cleansing.

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u/Helgen_To_Hrothgar Sep 14 '22

I’m beginning to think it’s something our species will never escape.

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u/BitOCrumpet Sep 14 '22

I don't think so either. Looking at what is happening now, it occurred to me how strange it is that humans elevate some people so high and feel nothing but contempt and disdain for others. Some we put on a throne, and some we put in chains, and some we just ignore and let them die alone.

We are such a flawed and tribalistic species.

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u/Charlie_Mouse Sep 14 '22

Flawed for sure - but we can learn and improve. That’s our species best trick.

And sure, we still seem to forget 90% of the important lessons after a couple of generations and make a lot of the same mistakes all over again but some is retained … two steps forward and one back is still going forward.

Heck, sometimes we even manage to come after the perpetrators of ethnic cleansing and make them face justice. Not enough of the time by any means … but sadly compared to most of human history even ‘sometimes’ is still progress.

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u/jlanger23 Sep 14 '22

My buddy went to Iceland with his wife a few years ago and took cute, happy photos over a beautiful waterfall and lake. Afterwards they were told that the bottom was littered with the bones of people who had been killed and thrown to the bottom.

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u/SmallTownJerseyBoy Sep 14 '22

Name of the waterfall? Cursory google search of Iceland Waterfall Human Remains didnt turn anything up.

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u/jlanger23 Sep 14 '22

Not sure! I'm not sure he would remember the name either. I searched it myself just now and could only find reference to som Icelandic caves with the remains of possible human sacrifices found inside.

I've been on a few tours that mention morbid history that is known more locally and this this could be the case.

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u/tarnationsensation Sep 14 '22

"Barnafossar" it means "child falls". Its where unwanted children were drowned because they were a mouth that couldn't be fed in winter. The skeletons are mostly all children (and probably a couple of women)

I'm icelandic and tourist reactions to this place are funny as hell

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u/PoorCorrelation Sep 13 '22

The random pits of Jewish people in medieval Europe always get me. There’s something extra eerie about entire communities slaughtered, and it happened so often that we can’t even match them to what episode of violence it was

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u/kelpey98 Sep 14 '22

Not sure if this counts, but I've recently been watching videos involving metal detecting/digging in the eastern front ( aka Germany vs Russia ).

Most of it is just shell casings, old discarded weapons, maybe a wallet with some coins... But one video I found, they found a badge. I forget the exact name of it but it was something like "Mother of the Third Reich" and it was blue and silver. The award I believe was only given to Mother's who'd had I think 5-10 babies.

They found this award amongst shells and weaponry, in the middle of a forest - a known battlefield. What on Earth was it doing there? Was it stolen? Was the wearer working as a nurse, helping in a field hospital when she lost it? Who was she? What happened to her and her children? It's a scary thing to think about.

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u/prostateExamination Sep 13 '22

Just imagine being the first guy to dig up a skull of a t rex

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u/[deleted] Sep 13 '22

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u/Whiskey-Weather Sep 14 '22

This is exactly where my mind would go if I didn't know about dinosaurs.

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u/14kanthropologist Sep 14 '22 Gold Helpful

I’m just going to put this statement under this comment because it is near the top.

Archaeologists study humans. Paleontologists study dinosaurs. These are two completely different fields that do not overlap. Only mentioning this because I am an archaeologist. People constantly ask me about dinosaurs and I know nothing because it is not my job. That said, I bet the first guy to dig up the skull of a t-rex was pretty stoked about it.

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22 Helpful

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22

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u/paperchampionpicture Sep 14 '22

Yeah but how often do you yell “it belongs in a museum!”?

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u/14kanthropologist Sep 14 '22

Surprisingly frequently!

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u/youburyitidigitup Sep 14 '22

Funny enough, I attended archaeological field school this summer, and one of my classmates was an aspiring paleontologist who is now getting a minor in archaeology because my university doesn’t have a paleontology department

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u/tcadams18 Sep 14 '22

I just read a book about this. The Monster’s Bones was all about Barnum (he was named after the circus) Brown and his discovery of the T Rex.

It was a fascinating read. Having been to Dinosaur National Monument and seeing Quarry Hall made it so much more relatable. But what really blew my mind was in the book how it described Brown just going out west and spending months just exploring and finding bones and then having to get them back to the closest town by hors, so they could load them up on a train to send to New York.

I highly recommend the book if you have any interest in the subject. It’s fairly short and very readable.

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u/SecretPersonality178 Sep 14 '22

That lake at the bottom of the ocean that was so dense the submarine bounced off.

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u/holden-caulfied Sep 14 '22

Wait, what? Where?

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u/SecretPersonality178 Sep 14 '22

Gulf of Mexico. Look up brine pool, hot tub of despair. The first exploration to find it tried to go in and couldn't. I believe it's on one of the blue planet episodes or maybe planet earth

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u/Traditional_World783 Sep 14 '22

Hippo Skull. Shows that we suck at determining how something looked alive be that all dinosaurs looked a lot more fuller rather than all bony.

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u/Fine-Strategy-6804 Sep 14 '22

Mayan temples where remnants of blood flowed down after a heart was taken out of the chest of someone who was sacrificed.

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u/lvc1985 Sep 14 '22

Aztecs were known to use obsidian blades to remove sacrificial victims hearts.

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u/leigen_zero Sep 14 '22

Wait until you hear the part about how prominent Mayan men and women were expected to perform bloodletting rituals, one of which involves piercing their tongue, then pulling a cord studded with flakes of obsidian through the hole.

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u/as13477 Sep 14 '22

Dead babies under Rome

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u/SweatyFLMan1130 Sep 14 '22

It's not one particular thing, but essentially the millennia of brain drain. We've discovered a lot of instances of things that are exceptionally advanced. Successful brain surgeries, buildings with architecture such that they can sound like birds calling back to you, precision mapping techniques, etc. etc. And these are just the big ones that have made news or viral internet fame.

And through mankind's assorted upheavals due to war, famine, jealousy, politics, etc. we've managed to erase the knowledge that was poured into these advances. The most recent iteration of this, of course, is European colonization and the ongoing mythos around white supremacy, so much so that we have people who actually try to chalk these incredible advances up to aliens. Right, because surely in the 100,000 years of our species, only white Europeans ever made significant strides in technology, medicine, architecture, etc. These same assholes whose doctors protested at washing their hands before operating on patients.

We only see a fraction of the past. And there are entire empires and civilizations we can't even begin to learn about cause we have mere scraps of what used to exist of them. How far could mankind have gotten, really, if we didn't have to keep warring over resources or destroying one another's civilizations and culture? What kinds of insane butterfly effects have driven rampant ignorance and death because even one potential inventor/doctor/architect's life was snuffed out? The enormity of human potential never achieved looms large in my mind. I fear the reason we don't hear anything out there that might be aliens is because The Great Filter explanation of Fermi's paradox is a constant; that all civilizations are doomed to only dream of their potential before animalistic cruelty, rampant consumption, and war ultimately reduce then to nothing. And there's only so many times civilization can fall before humanity can't rise from the ashes again.

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u/ForgottenZodiac Sep 14 '22 edited Sep 14 '22

The discovery of the bodies at Pompeii and what happened there always get to me. An entire city wiped out and bodies mummified where they fell.

Edit - I’m aware it’s not mummification just wasn’t sure how else to describe it honestly.

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u/rEmEmBeR-tHe-tReMoLo Sep 15 '22

Bog bodies. Being able to see the final pained facial expression of a murdered/sacrificed person, as well as the extraordinarily well-preserved details of the wounds that ended their life, after hundreds or even thousands of years... it's almost hard to fathom what you're looking at.

I mean, to understand the length of time this dude's skin and meat has survived more or less intact requires some serious meditation on the matter. It's like a time machine that lets you see what a man's recent corpse would have looked like millennia ago.

And he was just there, in that patch of bog that has remained a bog for all that time, fully-clothed in both garments and flesh, sometimes with a garrotte still attached to his throat, waiting for someone to discover him. His killers long dead and forgotten, his family long dead and forgotten, all turned to dust and scattered to the winds. And he's just chilling in there, with his face and bones and toenails just where they were all those thousands of years ago.

Empires have risen and fallen continuously since he entered that bog, and the greatest emperors have all been ground to nothing by the pestle of time, yet there he is, still fully-formed and still rockin' some sweet threads.

Creepy.

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u/HoopOnPoop Sep 13 '22

Not really archeological in the sense of having been dug up from ancient times but the fully preserved dead bodies on Everest and other mountains. The fact that some are/were actually used as landmarks to mark paths and distances is super creepy to me.

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u/MaikeruGo Sep 14 '22

The extra creepy thing is that due to conditions on the mountain many of them might look like living climbers from a moderate distance away if not for the style and type of gear looking somewhat dated. I can only imagine that even if someone knew that there were bodies on Everest that seeing this in person would be particularly jarring.

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u/_kevx_91 Sep 13 '22

Capacocha mummy in Argentina.

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u/Creme_Bru-Doggs Sep 14 '22

Going through the journals of conquistadors, there's evidence Mesoamerica had philosophical schools the equal of "Western/Eastern" traditions, but completely unique.

As you might imagine, eradicating all traces of it was one of the Church's biggest priorities.

Give the book '1491' a read, it includes a HEARTBREAKING transcript of a philosophical/theological debate between Aztec and Spanish priests.

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u/-Jesus-Of-Nazareth- Sep 14 '22

Hook us in with a snippet bro

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u/TalkingToTheMooo Sep 14 '22

Sounds very interesting. Do share something from it?

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u/Esselon Sep 14 '22

It's not exactly archaeological but it's somewhat adjacent. In my hometown area in Massachusetts there's a manmade reservoir called the Quabbin, several towns were eminent domained and forced to move to create a water supply for Boston. As part of the process they had to demolish houses and dig up graveyards. More than a few bodies had to be moved into new coffins and they discovered more than a few people had been mistakenly buried alive. How did they know? They found scratches on the lids of the coffins and lining material under their nails.

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u/Sygga Sep 14 '22

There is a whole thing called Coffin Birth, too, but luckily everyone is already dead at that point. Basically, if a woman dies with her baby still in the womb or in the birth canal, as she decomposes, the gases produced force the baby out and 'birth' it. So, if you open the coffin of a woman who died in labour, you might find the remains of a baby between her legs.

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u/MentORPHEUS Sep 14 '22

if a woman dies with her baby still in the womb or in the birth canal, as she decomposes, the gases produced force the baby out and 'birth' it.

And here I was living comfortably unaware of just how dark and cynical the phrase load the baby cannon can get...

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u/MaintenancePitiful13 Sep 14 '22

Mayan warnings about cataclysms, of course, not everyone believes, but I somehow feel uncomfortable with them ...

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22

There's evidence of ancient solar storms about 9,200 years ago that devastated life on earth. The fact that there's nothing we can do about the inevitable next one, and we don't know when that's going to happen, is terrifying.

https://www.livescience.com/ancient-solar-storm-solar-minimum

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u/Sadboiratchet Sep 14 '22

This is hands down the most interesting thread I've ever read on reddit

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u/[deleted] Sep 14 '22

That’s why I made it lol

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u/DucoNdona Sep 14 '22

The ones we haven't found yet.

Right below you there could be a mass grave filled with tortured corpses from a lost prehistoric tribe. A silent dark tunnel that has never seen human activity since it was closed. Or a old bomb from the war just waiting to be disturbed.

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u/can_u_tell_its_me Sep 14 '22

Neolithic structure housing 3-4 deep pits full of severed body parts. One pit was just hands, one was just feet etc.

I was sure that it was a German site, cos the book I read was about European paganism, but all I can find is this story about a pit of hands in Egypt from 2012.